SIGCSE Data Update

This is all of the data used in the site, displayed in one long page. The purpose is to have members of the community use this as a “cheat sheet” to double check the quality of the information included in the site. Items are numbered for each of identifying items that might need updating.

Menu: [ board.yml | organization.yml | symposia.yml | iticse.yml | icer.yml | comped.yml | Upcoming Conference Dates | ITiCSE Conferences | ICER Conferences | CompEd Conferences | RESPECT Conferences | incoop.yml | workinggroups.yml | bestpaper.yml | outstanding.yml | lifetime.yml | broadening.yml | testoftime.yml | travelgrants.yml | specialprojects.yml ]

board.yml (↑ top)

year: 2022-2025
members:

  - name: Alison Clear
    image: alison2.jpg
    position: Chair
    affiliation: Eastern Institute of Technology, Auckland
    country: New Zealand
    email: aclear@eit.ac.nz

  - name: Brett A. Becker
    image: becker.png
    position: Vice Chair
    affiliation: University College Dublin
    country: Ireland
    email: brett.becker+sigcse-vice-chair@ucd.ie

  - name: Jill Denner
    image: denner.jpg
    position: Treasurer
    affiliation: 
    country: USA
    email: jillxdenner@gmail.com

  - name: Dan Garcia
    image: d_garcia.jpg
    position: Secretary
    affiliation: University of California Berkeley
    country: USA
    email: ddgarcia.SIGCSE.Secretary@gmail.com

  - name: Rodrigo Duran
    image: rodrigo-duran.jpg
    position: At Large Member
    affiliation: Federal Institute of Mato Grosso do Sul
    country: Brazil
    email: rodrigo.duran@ifms.edu.br

  - name: Yolanda A. Rankin
    image: ranking.jpg
    position: At Large Member
    affiliation: Florida State University
    country: USA
    email: yrankin@gmail.com

  - name: Judy Sheard
    image: judy-sheard.jpg
    position: At Large Member
    affiliation: Monash University
    country: Australia
    email: judy.sheard@monash.edu

  - name: Adrienne Decker
    image: adrianne2022.jpg
    position: Past Chair
    affiliation: University at Buffalo
    country: USA
    email: adrienne@buffalo.edu

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organization.yml (↑ top)

committees:
- name: Doctoral consortium coordinators
  info: 2019
  members:
    - name: Amy Ko
      affiliation: University of Washington, USA
      year: senior

    - name: Katrina Falkner
      affiliation: University of Adelaide, Australia
      year: junior

- name: New Educators' Roundtable organizers
  info: 2020
  members:
    - name: Zachary Dodds
      affiliation: Harvey Mudd College, USA
      year: senior

    - name: Diane Horton
      affiliation: University of Toronto, Canada
      year: junior

- name: Chairs' Roundtable organizers
  info: 2021
  members:
    - name: Ran Libeskind-Hadas
      affiliation: Harvey Mudd College, USA
      year: senior

    - name: Cynthia Lester
      affiliation: Georgia State University, USA
      year: junior

- name: Bulletin editors

  members:
    - name: Charles Wallace
      affiliation: Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, USA
      year: May 1 2021 -- April 30 2024

    - name: Jeffrey Miller
      affiliation: University of Southern California, USA
      year: May 1 2019 -- April 30 2022

- name: Information Directors
  info: We have three information directors, approved by the SIGCSE Board. The participation as information director is a 3 year term, renewable once. This renewal is upon mutual interest from the information director and approval of the board.
  members:
    - name: Haris Skiadas
      affiliation: Hanover College, USA
      year: until March 31 2022

    - name: David Zabnar
      affiliation: Cornell College, USA
      year: until March 31 2023

- name: Social Media Coordinator

  members:
    - name: Zahra Atiq
      affiliation: Ohio State University, USA
      year: 2020 -- 2023

- name: Special Projects/Speaker's Fund/Travel Grant reviewers

  members:
    - name: Mary Anne Egan
      affiliation: Siena College, USA
      year: 2019 -- 2022

    - name: Andrew Luxton-Reilly
      affiliation: University of Auckland, New Zealand
      year: 2019 -- 2022

    - name: Laurie Murphy
      affiliation: Pacific Lutheran University, USA
      year: 2019 -- 2022

    - name: Amber Settle
      affiliation: DePaul University, USA
      year: 2019 -- 2022

    - name: Aleata Hubbard Cheuoua
      affiliation: WestEd, USA
      year: 2022 -- 2025

    - name: Kalpathi Subramanian
      affiliation: University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA
      year: 2022 -- 2025

    - name: Michael C. Robbeloth
      affiliation: Mount Vernon Nazarene University, USA
      year: 2022 -- 2025

- name: Awards committee

  members:
    - name: Mona Ali



    - name: Lina Battestilli



    - name: Dennis J Bouvier



    - name: Tony Clear



    - name: Michelle Craig



    - name: Becca Dovi



    - name: Dianne Levitt



    - name: Robert McCartney



    - name: Leo Porter



    - name: Guido Rößling



    - name: Christian Servin



    - name: Andreas Stefik



    - name: Henry Walker



    - name: Jacqueline Whalley



    - name: 1 Anonymous



- name: SIGCSE.org Website Administrator

  members:
    - name: Manuel A. Pérez-Quiñones
      affiliation: University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA
      year: July 1 2019 -- present

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symposia.yml (↑ top)

Steering committee

  1. Sarah Heckman, NC State University, NC (chair)
  2. Steve Wolfman, The University of British Columbia (secretary)
  3. Leen-Kiat Soh, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  4. Kurt Eiselt, UC Davis
  5. Adrienne Decker, University at Buffalo, NY (SIGCSE board liaison)

Site selection committee chairs

  1. Laurie Smith King, College of the Holy Cross, USA (senior chair: 2023-2026)
  2. Jodi Tims, Northeastern University, USA (junior chair: 2023-2026)

Site selection pool members

  1. Tracy Camp, Computing Research Association, USA
  2. Adrienne Decker, University at Buffalo, USA
  3. John Dougherty, Haverford College, USA
  4. Scott McElfresh, Christopher Newport University, USA
  5. Kristine Nagel, Georgia Tech, USA
  6. Steve Wolfman, The University of British Columbia

Exhibitor liaisons

  1. Beth Hawthorne, Rider University, USA (2021-2023, term 1)
  2. Jodi Tims, Northeastern University, USA (2021-2023, term 2)

Registration team

We have three members in the registration team, approved by the SIGCSE Board. Participation in the registration team is a 3 year term, renewable once. This renewal is upon mutual interest from the team member and approval of the board.

  1. Rachelle Kristof Hippler, Baldwin Wallace University, USA (2020-2022, term 1)
  2. Sarah Heckman, North Carolina State University, USA (2021-2023, term 1)
  3. Briana Morrison, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE (2022-2024, term 1)

Web/Data administrator

  1. Adam Blank, Caltech, USA (2020 - end of 2022 Symposium)

Technical Symposium Conferences

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iticse.yml (↑ top)

Steering committee

  1. Simon, The University of Newcastle, Australia
  2. Michael Caspersen, It-vest Networking Universities (Informatics Europe)
  3. Guido Röβling, TU Darmstadt, Germany
  4. Michael Kӧlling, King’s College London (ACM Europe)
  5. Brett A. Becker, University College Dublin (SIGCSE Board)

Doctoral consortium

  1. Neena Thota, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA (2019 – 2021)
  2. Andreas Mühling, Kiel University, Germany (2021 – 2022)

Supporter liaison

  1. Keith Quille, Department of Computing at TU Dublin

Submissions/database administrator

  1. Stan Kurkovsky, Central Connecticut State University
  2. Carsten Kleiner, University of Applied Sciences and Arts

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ITiCSE Conferences

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icer.yml (↑ top)

Steering committee

  1. Sally Fincher, University of Kent, UK
  2. Quintin Cutts, University of Glasgow, UK
  3. Mark Guzdial, University of Michigan, USA
  4. Brian Dorn, University of Nebraska Omaha, USA
  5. Leo Porter, UC San Diego, USA (SIGCSE Board)

Submissions/database administrator

  1. Ray Pettit, University of Virginia , USA (2019-2021)
  2. Simon, University of Newcastle, Australia (- 2019)

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ICER Conferences

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comped.yml (↑ top)

Steering Committee

  1. Brett Becker, University College Dublin, Ireland (Chair)
  2. Susan Rodger, Duke University, USA
  3. Alison Clear, Eastern Institute of Technology, NZ
  4. Dan Garcia, UC Berkeley
  5. Venkatesh Choppella, IIIT Hyderabad
  6. Ethel Tshukudu, University of Botswana

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CompEd Conferences

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events.yml (↑ top)

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RESPECT Conferences

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incoop.yml (↑ top)

  1. ACE 2022 - https://aceconference.wordpress.com/
  2. ACE 2022 - https://aceconference.wordpress.com/
  3. ACM Compute 2022 - https://event.india.acm.org/Compute/
  4. CCSC CP 2022 - https://www.ccsc.org/centralplains/
  5. CCSC NE 2022 - http://ccscne.org/conferences/ccscne-2022/
  6. CCSC SC 2022 - http://www.ccsc.org/southcentral/conference2022.html
  7. CCSC SW 2022 - http://www.ccsc.org/southwestern/2022/index.php
  8. CCSC-EA ‘22
  9. CCSC-MW ‘22
  10. CCSC-NW ‘22
  11. CCSC-RM ‘22
  12. CMSC 2022 - http://cmsc-uib.org/
  13. Koli Calling 2022 - https://www.kolicalling.fi/
  14. WiPSCE 2022 - https://www.wipsce.org/2022/

  15. CCSC SE 2021 - http://ccscse.org/conference.php?year=35th
  16. CCSC-EA ‘21
  17. CCSC-MW ‘21
  18. CCSC-NW ‘21
  19. CCSC-RM ‘21 - https://ccsc.org/rm2021/
  20. WiPSCE ‘21 - https://www.wipsce.org/2021/

  21. CCSC-MS ‘20 - http://www.ccsc-ms.org/
  22. CCSC-NE ‘20 - http://ccscne.org/conferences/ccscne-2020/
  23. CCSC-SC ‘20 - http://www.ccsc.org/southcentral/conference2020.html
  24. CCSC-SW ‘20 - http://ccsc.org/southwestern/2020/index.php

  25. ACE 2019: Australasian Computing Education conference - https://aceconference.wordpress.com/
  26. CCSC-CP ‘19 - https://www.ccsc.org/centralplains/
  27. CCSC-EA ‘19 - https://sites.google.com/site/ccsceastern/Home
  28. CCSC-MS ‘19 - http://www.ccsc-ms.org/
  29. CCSC-MW ‘19 - http://www.ccsc.org/northwest/2018/index.html
  30. CCSC-NE ‘19 - http://ccscne.org/conferences/ccscne-2019/
  31. CCSC-NW ‘19 - http://www.ccsc.org/northwest/2019/index.html
  32. CCSC-RM ‘19 - http://www.ccsc.org/rockymt/
  33. CCSC-SC ‘19 - http://www.ccsc.org/southcentral/conference2019.html
  34. CCSC-SE ‘19 - http://www.ccscse.org/
  35. CCSC-SW ‘19 - http://www.ccsc.org/southwestern/index.php
  36. Computing Education Practice (CEP) conference - http://community.dur.ac.uk/cep.conference
  37. JADIPro ‘19 - https://jadipro.unc.edu.ar/
  38. WCCCE ‘19 - https://wccce2019.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/

  39. 18th Koli Calling International Conference on Computing Education Research - https://www.kolicalling.fi/
  40. WiPSCE ‘18 - http://www.informatikdidaktik.de/WiPSCE2018

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workinggroups (↑ top)

  1. James Paterson, Joshua Adams, Laurie White, Andrew Csizmadia, D. Cenk Erdil, Derek Foster, Mark Hills, Zain Kazmi, Karthik Kuber, Sajid Nazir, Majd Sakr, and Lee Stott.. 2022. Designing Dissemination and Validation of a Framework for Teaching Cloud Fundamentals. In Proceedings of the 2021 Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 163–181.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3502870.3506569

  2. Rajendra Raj, Mihaela Sabin, John Impagliazzo, David Bowers, Mats Daniels, Felienne Hermans, Natalie Kiesler, Amruth N. Kumar, Bonnie MacKellar, Renée McCauley, Syed Waqar Nabi, and Michael Oudshoorn.. 2022. Professional Competencies in Computing Education: Pedagogies and Assessment. In Proceedings of the 2021 Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 133–161.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3502870.3506570

  3. Briana B. Morrison, Beth A. Quinn, Steven Bradley, Kevin Buffardi, Brian Harrington, Helen H. Hu, Maria Kallia, Fiona McNeill, Oluwakemi Ola, Miranda Parker, Jennifer Rosato, and Jane Waite.. 2022. Evidence for Teaching Practices that Broaden Participation for Women in Computing. In Proceedings of the 2021 Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 57–131.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3502870.3506568

  4. Michael James Scott, Rory Summerley, Nicolas Besombes, Cornelia Connolly, Joey Gawrysiak, Tzipora Halevi, Seth E. Jenny, Michael Miljanovic, Melissa Stange, Toni Taipalus, and J. Patrick Williams.. 2022. Foundations for Esports Curricula in Higher Education. In Proceedings of the 2021 Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 27–55.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3502870.3506566

  5. Angela A. Siegel, Mark Zarb, Bedour Alshaigy, Jeremiah Blanchard, Tom Crick, Richard Glassey, John R. Hott, Celine Latulipe, Charles Riedesel, Mali Senapathi, Simon, and David Williams.. 2022. Teaching through a Global Pandemic: Educational Landscapes Before, During and After COVID-19. In Proceedings of the 2021 Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–25.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3502870.3506565

  6. Sally Fincher, Johan Jeuring, Craig S. Miller, Peter Donaldson, Benedict du Boulay, Matthias Hauswirth, Arto Hellas, Felienne Hermans, Colleen Lewis, Andreas Mühling, Janice L. Pearce, and Andrew Petersen. 2020. Notional Machines in Computing Education: The Education of Attention. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 21–50.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439202

  7. Alison Clear, Tony Clear, Abhijat Vichare, Thea Charles, Stephen Frezza, Mirela Gutica, Barry Lunt, Francesco Maiorana, Arnold Pears, Francois Pitt, Charles Riedesel, and Justyna Szynkiewicz. 2020. Designing Computer Science Competency Statements: A Process and Curriculum Model for the 21st Century. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 211–246.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439208

  8. Marian Petre, Kate Sanders, Robert McCartney, Marzieh Ahmadzadeh, Cornelia Connolly, Sally Hamouda, Brian Harrington, Jérémie Lumbroso, Joseph Maguire, Lauri Malmi, Monica M. McGill, and Jan Vahrenhold. 2020. Mapping the Landscape of Peer Review in Computing Education Research. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 173–209.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439207

  9. Joshua Adams, Brian Hainey, Laurie White, Derek Foster, Narine Hall, Mark Hills, Sara Hooshangi, Karthik Kuber, Sajid Nazir, Majd Sakr, Lee Stott, and Carmen Taglienti. 2020. Cloud Computing Curriculum: Developing Exemplar Modules for General Course Inclusion. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 151–172.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439206

  10. Mikhail Fominykh, Fridolin Wild, Ralf Klamma, Mark Billinghurst, Lisandra S. Costiner, Andrey Karsakov, Eleni Mangina, Judith Molka-Danielsen, Ian Pollock, Marius Preda, and Aljosa Smolic. 2020. Model Augmented Reality Curriculum. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 131–149.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439205

  11. Greg L. Nelson, Filip Strömbäck, Ari Korhonen, Marjahan Begum, Ben Blamey, Karen H. Jin, Violetta Lonati, Bonnie MacKellar, and Mattia Monga. 2020. Differentiated Assessments for Advanced Courses that Reveal Issues with Prerequisite Skills: A Design Investigation. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 75–129.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439204

  12. Rajendra K. Raj, Carol J. Romanowski, John Impagliazzo, Sherif G. Aly, Brett A. Becker, Juan Chen, Sheikh Ghafoor, Nasser Giacaman, Steven I. Gordon, Cruz Izu, Shahram Rahimi, Michael P. Robson, and Neena Thota. 2020. High Performance Computing Education: Current Challenges and Future Directions. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 51–74.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439203

  13. Simon, Oscar Karnalim, Judy Sheard, Ilir Dema, Amey Karkare, Juho Leinonen, Michael Liut, and Renée McCauley. 2020. Choosing Code Segments to Exclude from Code Similarity Detection. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–19.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3437800.3439201

  14. Dennis Bouvier, Ellie Lovellette, John Matta, Jing Bai, Jacqueline Chetty, Stan Kurkovsky, and Jia Wan. 2019. Factors Affecting the Adoption of Peer Instruction in Computing Courses. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Global Computing Education (CompEd-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–25.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3372262.3375396

  15. Brett A. Becker, Paul Denny, Raymond Pettit, Durell Bouchard, Dennis J. Bouvier, Brian Harrington, Amir Kamil, Amey Karkare, Chris McDonald, Peter-Michael Osera, Janice L. Pearce, and James Prather. 2019. Compiler Error Messages Considered Unhelpful: The Landscape of Text-Based Programming Error Message Research. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 177–210.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372508

  16. Derek Foster, Laurie White, D. Cenk Erdil, Joshua Adams, Amadeo Argüelles, Brian Hainey, Harvey Hyman, Gareth Lewis, Sajid Nazir, Van Nguyen, Majd Sakr, and Lee Stott. 2019. Toward a Cloud Computing Learning Community. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 143–155.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372506

  17. Katrina Falkner, Sue Sentance, Rebecca Vivian, Sarah Barksdale, Leonard Busuttil, Elizabeth Cole, Christine Liebe, Francesco Maiorana, Monica M. McGill, and Keith Quille. 2019. An International Study Piloting the MEasuring TeacheR Enacted Computing Curriculum (METRECC) Instrument. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 111–142.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372505

  18. Claudia Szabo, Nickolas Falkner, Andrew Petersen, Heather Bort, Kathryn Cunningham, Peter Donaldson, Arto Hellas, James Robinson, and Judy Sheard. 2019. Review and Use of Learning Theories within Computer Science Education Research: Primer for Researchers and Practitioners. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 89–109.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372504

  19. Rajendra K. Raj, Allen Parrish, John Impagliazzo, Carol J. Romanowski, Sherif G. Aly, Casey C. Bennett, Karen C. Davis, Andrew McGettrick, Teresa Susana Mendes Pereira, and Lovisa Sundin. 2019. An Empirical Approach to Understanding Data Science and Engineering Education. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 73–87.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372503

  20. Simon, Andrew Luxton-Reilly, Vangel V. Ajanovski, Eric Fouh, Christabel Gonsalvez, Juho Leinonen, Jack Parkinson, Matthew Poole, and Neena Thota. 2019. Pass Rates in Introductory Programming and in other STEM Disciplines. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 53–71.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372502

  21. Cruz Izu, Carsten Schulte, Ashish Aggarwal, Quintin Cutts, Rodrigo Duran, Mirela Gutica, Birte Heinemann, Eileen Kraemer, Violetta Lonati, Claudio Mirolo, and Renske Weeda. 2019. Fostering Program Comprehension in Novice Programmers - Learning Activities and Learning Trajectories. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 27–52.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372501

  22. Ian Pollock, Bedour Alshaigy, Andrew Bradley, Birgit R. Krogstie, Viraj Kumar, Linda Ott, Anne-Kathrin Peters, Charles Riedesel, and Charles Wallace. 2019. 1.5 Degrees of Separation: Computer Science Education in the Age of the Anthropocene. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–25.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372500

  23. Xenia Mountrouidou, David Vosen, Chadi Kari, Mohammad Q. Azhar, Sajal Bhatia, Greg Gagne, Joseph Maguire, Liviana Tudor, and Timothy T. Yuen. 2019. Securing the Human: A Review of Literature on Broadening Diversity in Cybersecurity Education. In Proceedings of the Working Group Reports on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 157–176.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3344429.3372507

  24. Allen Parrish, John Impagliazzo, Rajendra K. Raj, Henrique Santos, Muhammad Rizwan Asghar, Audun Jøsang, Teresa Pereira, and Eliana Stavrou. 2018. Global perspectives on cybersecurity education for 2030: a case for a meta-discipline. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 36–54.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295778

  25. Michael Morgan, Matthew Butler, Jane Sinclair, Christabel Gonsalvez, and Neena Thota. 2018. Contrasting CS student and academic perspectives and experiences of student engagement. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–35.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295777

  26. Barry Burd, Lecia Barker, Félix Armando Fermín Pérez, Ingrid Russell, Bill Siever, Liviana Tudor, Michael McCarthy, and Ian Pollock. 2018. The internet of things in undergraduate computer and information science education: exploring curricula and pedagogy. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 200–216.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295784

  27. Arto Hellas, Petri Ihantola, Andrew Petersen, Vangel V. Ajanovski, Mirela Gutica, Timo Hynninen, Antti Knutas, Juho Leinonen, Chris Messom, and Soohyun Nam Liao. 2018. Predicting academic performance: a systematic literature review. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 175–199.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295783

  28. Stephen Frezza, Mats Daniels, Arnold Pears, Åsa Cajander, Viggo Kann, Amanpreet Kapoor, Roger McDermott, Anne-Kathrin Peters, Mihaela Sabin, and Charles Wallace. 2018. Modelling competencies for computing education beyond 2020: a research based approach to defining competencies in the computing disciplines. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 148–174.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295782

  29. Derek Foster, Laurie White, Joshua Adams, D. Cenk Erdil, Harvey Hyman, Stan Kurkovsky, Majd Sakr, and Lee Stott. 2018. Cloud computing: developing contemporary computer science curriculum for a cloud-first future. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 130–147.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295781

  30. Mark Zarb, Bedour Alshaigy, Dennis Bouvier, Richard Glassey, Janet Hughes, and Charles Riedesel. 2018. An international investigation into student concerns regarding transition into higher education computing. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 107–129.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295780

  31. Andrew Luxton-Reilly, Simon, Ibrahim Albluwi, Brett A. Becker, Michail Giannakos, Amruth N. Kumar, Linda Ott, James Paterson, Michael James Scott, Judy Sheard, and Claudia Szabo. 2018. Introductory programming: a systematic literature review. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 55–106.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295779

  32. Cynthia Taylor, Jaime Spacco, David P. Bunde, Zack Butler, Heather Bort, Christopher Lynnly Hovey, Francesco Maiorana, and Thomas Zeume. 2018. Propagating the adoption of CS educational innovations. In Proceedings Companion of the 23rd Annual ACM Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE 2018 Companion). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 217–235.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/3293881.3295785

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  98. Hilary J. Holz, Anne Applin, Bruria Haberman, Donald Joyce, Helen Purchase, and Catherine Reed. 2006. _Research methods in computing: what are they, and how should we teach them? _. In In Working group reports on ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘06). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 96–114.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1189215.1189180

  99. Guido Rößling, Thomas Naps, Mark S. Hall, Ville Karavirta, Andreas Kerren, Charles Leska, Andrés Moreno, Rainer Oechsle, Susan H. Rodger, Jaime Urquiza-Fuentes, and J. Ángel Velázquez-Iturbide. 2006. Merging interactive visualizations with hypertextbooks and course management. In Working group reports on ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘06). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 166–181.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1189215.1189184

  100. Lillian N. Cassel, Anneke Hacquebard, Andrew McGettrick, Gordon Davies, Richard LeBlanc, Charles Riedesel, Yaakov L Varol, Gail T. Finley, Samuel Mann, and Robert H. Sloan. 2005. A synthesis of computing concepts.. In SIGCSE Bull. 37, 4 (December 2005), 162–172.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1113847.1113894

  101. Arnold Pears, Stephen Seidman, Crystal Eney, Päivi Kinnunen, and Lauri Malmi. 2005. Constructing a core literature for computing education research.. In SIGCSE Bull. 37, 4 (December 2005), 152–161.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1113847.1113893

  102. Vicki L. Almstrum, Lecia J. Barker, Barbara Boucher Owens, Elizabeth Adams, William Aspray, Nell B. Dale, Wanda Dann, Andrea Lawrence, and Leslie Schwartzman. 2005. Building a sense of history: narratives and pathways of women computing educators.. In SIGCSE Bull. 37, 4 (December 2005), 173–189.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1113847.1113895

  103. Ursula Fuller, June Amillo, Cary Laxer, W. Michael McCracken, and Joseph Mertz. 2005. Facilitating student learning through study abroad and international projects.. In SIGCSE Bull. 37, 4 (December 2005), 139–151.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1113847.1113892

  104. Raymond Lister, Elizabeth S. Adams, Sue Fitzgerald, William Fone, John Hamer, Morten Lindholm, Robert McCartney, Jan Erik Moström, Kate Sanders, Otto Seppälä, Beth Simon, and Lynda Thomas. 2004. A multi-national study of reading and tracing skills in novice programmers. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘04). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 119–150.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/1044550.1041673

  105. Janet Carter, Kirsti Ala-Mutka, Ursula Fuller, Martin Dick, John English, William Fone, and Judy Sheard. 2003. How shall we assess this? In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘03). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 107–123.. In
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960875.960539

  106. Sylvia Alexander, Martyn Clark, Ken Loose, June Amillo, Mats Daniels, Roger Boyle, Cary Laxer, and Dermot Shinners-Kennedy. 2003. Case studies in admissions to and early performance in computer science degrees. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘03). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 137–147.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960875.960541

  107. Thomas Naps, Stephen Cooper, Boris Koldehofe, Charles Leska, Guido Rößling, Wanda Dann, Ari Korhonen, Lauri Malmi, Jarmo Rantakokko, Rockford J. Ross, Jay Anderson, Rudolf Fleischer, Marja Kuittinen, and Myles McNally. 2003. Evaluating the educational impact of visualization. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘03). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 124–136.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960875.960540

  108. Pamela B. Lawhead, Michaele E. Duncan, Constance G. Bland, Michael Goldweber, Madeleine Schep, David J. Barnes, and Ralph G. Hollingsworth. 2002. A road map for teaching introductory programming using LEGO© mindstorms robots. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘02). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 191–201.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960568.783002

  109. Peter B. Henderson, Lew Hitchner, Sister Jane Fritz, Bill Marion, Christelle Scharff, John Hamer, and Charles Riedesel. 2002. Materials development in support of mathematical thinking. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘02). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 185–190.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960568.783001

  110. Martin Dick, Judy Sheard, Cathy Bareiss, Janet Carter, Donald Joyce, Trevor Harding, and Cary Laxer. 2002. Addressing student cheating: definitions and solutions. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘02). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 172–184.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960568.783000

  111. Thomas L. Naps, Guido Rößling, Vicki Almstrum, Wanda Dann, Rudolf Fleischer, Chris Hundhausen, Ari Korhonen, Lauri Malmi, Myles McNally, Susan Rodger, and J. Ángel Velázquez-Iturbide. 2002. Exploring the role of visualization and engagement in computer science education. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘02). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 131–152.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960568.782998

  112. John P. Dougherty, Tom Dececchi, Tony Clear, Brad Richards, Stephen Cooper, and Tadeusz Wilusz. 2002. Information technology fluency in practice. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘02). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 153–171.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/960568.782999

  113. Vicki L. Almstrum, C. Neville Dean, Don Goelman, Thomas B. Hilburn, and Jan Smith. 2001. Support for teaching formal methods. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘00). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 71–88.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/571968.571970

  114. Michael McCracken, Vicki Almstrum, Danny Diaz, Mark Guzdial, Dianne Hagan, Yifat Ben-David Kolikant, Cary Laxer, Lynda Thomas, Ian Utting, and Tadeusz Wilusz. 2001. A multi-national, multi-institutional study of assessment of programming skills of first-year CS students. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘01). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 125–180.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/572133.572137

  115. Peter B. Henderson, Doug Baldwin, Venu Dasigi, Marcel Dupras, Jane Fritz, David Ginat, Don Goelman, John Hamer, Lew Hitchner, Will Lloyd, Bill Marion, Charles Riedesel, and Henry Walker. 2001. Striving for mathematical thinking. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘01). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 114–124.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/572133.572136

  116. Tony Clear, Michael Goldweber, Frank H. Young, Paul M. Leidig, and Kirk Scott. 2001. Resources for instructors of capstone courses in computing. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘01). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 93–113.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/572133.572135

  117. Joyce Currie Little, Mary Granger, Elizabeth S. Adams, Jaana Holvikivi, Susan K. Lippert, Henry M. Walker, and Alison Young. 2001. Integrating cultural issues into the computer and information technology curriculum. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘00). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 136–154.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/571968.571975

  118. Jari Lavonen, Veijo Meisalo, Matti Lattu, Liisa Leinonen, and Tadeusz Wilusz. 2001. Using computers in science and technology education. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘00). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 127–135.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/571968.571974

  119. Lillian (Boots) Cassel, Mark Holliday, Deepak Kumar, John Impagliazzo, Kevin Bolding, Murray Pearson, Jim Davies, Gregory S. Wolffe, and William Yurcik. 2001. Distributed expertise for teaching computer organization & architecture. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘00). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 111–126.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/571968.571973

  120. Tony Clear, Arto Haataja, Jeanine Meyer, Jarkko Suhonen, and Stuart A. Varden. 2001. Dimensions of distance learning for computer education. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘00). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 101–110.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/571968.571972

  121. Joseph Bergin, Charles Kelemen, Myles McNally, Tom Naps, Mike Goldweber, Chris Power, and Stephen Hartley. 2001. Non-programming resources for an introduction to CS: a collection of resources for the first courses in computer science. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘00). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 89–100.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/571968.571971

  122. Deborah Knox, Don Goelman, Sally Fincher, James Hightower, Nell Dale, Ken Loose, Elizabeth Adams, and Fred Springsteel. 1999. The Peer Review Process of Teaching Materials: Report of the ITiCSE’99 Working Group on Validation of the quality of teaching materials. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘99). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 87–100.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/349316.571915

  123. Joseph Bergin, Amruth Kumar, Viera K. Proulx, Myles McNally, Alyce Faulstich Brady, David Mutchler, Stephen Hartley, Richard Rasala, Charles Kelemen, Rocky Ross, and Frank Klassner. 1999. Resources for Next Generation Introductory CS Courses: Report of the ITiCSE’99 Working Group on Resources for the Next Generation CS 1 Course. In Working group reports from ITiCSE on Innovation and technology in computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘99). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 101–105.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/349316.571916

  124. M. Dee Medley, Rebecca H. Rutherfoord, G. Ernest Anderson, R. Waldo Roth, and Stuart A. Varden. 1998. Ethical issues related to internet development and research. In Working Group reports of the 3rd annual SIGCSE/SIGCUE ITiCSE conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘98). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 57–72.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/316572.358299

  125. Ainslie Ellis, Linda Carswell, Andrew Bernat, Daniel Deveaux, Patrice Frison, Veijo Meisalo, Jeanine Meyer, Urban Nulden, Joze Rugelj, and Jorma Tarhio. 1998. Resources, tools, and techniques for problem based learning in computing. In Working Group reports of the 3rd annual SIGCSE/SIGCUE ITiCSE conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘98). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 41–56.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/316572.358296

  126. Joseph Bergin, Thomas L. Naps, Constance G. Bland, Stephen J. Hartley, Mark A. Holliday, Pamela B. Lawhead, John Lewis, Myles F. McNally, Christopher H. Nevison, Cheng Ng, George J. Pothering, and Tommi Teräsvirta. 1998. Java resources for computer science instruction. In Working Group reports of the 3rd annual SIGCSE/SIGCUE ITiCSE conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘98). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 14–34.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/316572.358291

  127. Scott Grissom, Deborah Knox, Elana Copperman, Wanda Dann, Michael Goldweber, Janet Hartman, Marja Kuittinen, David Mutchler, and Nick Parlante. 1998. Developing a digital library of computer science teaching resources. In Working Group reports of the 3rd annual SIGCSE/SIGCUE ITiCSE conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘98). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–13.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/316572.358289

  128. Stan J. Thomas, Cary Laxer, Tomohiro Nishida, and Helen Sherlock. 1998. The impact of campus-wide portable computing on computer science education. In Working Group reports of the 3rd annual SIGCSE/SIGCUE ITiCSE conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE-WGR ‘98). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 35–40.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/316572.358294

  129. Daniel Joyce, Deborah Knox, Jill Gerhardt-Powals, Elliot Koffman, Wolfgang Kreuzer, Cary Laxer, Kenneth Loose, Erkki Sutinen, and R. Alan Whitehurst. 1997. Developing laboratories for the SIGCSE computing laboratory repository: guidelines, recommendations, and sample labs (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on designing laboratory materials for computing courses). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1–12.
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  130. Michael Goldweber, John Impagliazzo, Iouri A. Bogoiavlenski, A. G. Clear, Gordon Davies, Hans Flack, J. Paul Myers, and Richard Rasala. 1997. Historical perspectives on the computing curriculum (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on historical perspectives in computing education). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 94–111.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/266057.266119

  131. Douglas Siviter, Marian Petre, and Bruce Klein. 1997. Harnessing technology for effective inter- and intra-institutional collaboration (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on supporting inter- and intra institutional collaboration). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 70–93.
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  132. Ursula Wolz, Jacob Palme, Penny Anderson, Zhi Chen, James Dunne, Göran Karlsson, Atika Laribi, Sirkku Männikkö, Robert Spielvogel, and Henry Walker. 1997. Computer-mediated communication in collaborative educational settings (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on CMC in collaborative educational settings). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 51–69.
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  133. Mary J. Granger, Joyce Currie Little, Elizabeth S. Adams, Christina Björkman, Don Gotterbarn, Diana D. Juettner, C. Dianne Martin, and Frank H. Young. 1997. Using information technology to integrate social and ethical issues into the computer science and information systems curriculum (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on social and ethical issue in computing curricula). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 38–50.
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  134. Pamela B. Lawhead, Elizabeth Alpert, Constance G. Bland, Linda Carswell, Dawn Cizmar, Jean DeWitt, Mihaela Dumitru, Eva R. Fahraeus, and Kirk Scott. 1997. The Web and distance learning: what is appropriate and what is not (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on the web and distance learning). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 27–37.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/266057.266067

  135. Thomas Naps, Joseph Bergin, Ricardo Jiménez-Peris, Myles F. McNally, Marta Patiño-Martínez, Viera K. Proulx, and Jorma Tarhio. 1997. Using the WWW as the delivery mechanism for interactive, visualization-based instructional modules (report of the ITiCSE ‘97 working group on visualization). In The supplemental proceedings of the conference on Integrating technology into computer science education: working group reports and supplemental proceedings (ITiCSE-WGR ‘97). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 13–26.
    https://doi.org/10.1145/266057.266062

  136. Elizabeth S. Adams, Linda Carswell, Amruth Kumar, Jeanine Meyer, Ainslie Ellis, Patrick Hall, and John Motil. 1996. Interactive multimedia pedagogies: report of the working group on interactive multimedia pedagogy. In Proceedings of the 1st conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE ‘96). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 182–191.
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  137. Stephen Hartley, Jill Gerhardt-Powals, David Jones, Colin McCormack, M. Dee Medley, Blaine Price, Margaret Reek, and Marguerite K. Summers. 1996. Enhancing teaching using the Internet: report of the working group on the World Wide Web as an interactive teaching resource. In Proceedings of the 1st conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE ‘96). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 218–228.
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  138. Joe Bergin, Ken Brodie, Marta Patiño-Martínez, Myles McNally, Tom Naps, Susan Rodger, Judith Wilson, Michael Goldweber, Sami Khuri, and Ricardo Jiménez-Peris. 1996. An overview of visualization: its use and design: report of the working group in visualization. In Proceedings of the 1st conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE ‘96). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 192–200.
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  140. Deborah Knox, Ursula Wolz, Daniel Joyce, Elliot Koffman, Joan Krone, Atika Laribi, J. Paul Myers, Viera K. Proulx, and Kenneth A. Reek. 1996. Use of laboratories in computer science education: guidelines for good practice: report of the working group on computing laboratories.. In Proceedings of the 1st conference on Integrating technology into computer science education (ITiCSE ‘96). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 167–181.
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Best Papers for Best Paper

  1. Celine Latulipe, N. Bruce Long, and Carlos E. Seminario. 2015. Structuring Flipped Classes with Lightweight Teams and Gamification. In Proceedings of the 46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘15). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 392–397.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/2676723.2677240>

  2. Claudia Szabo. 2014. Student projects are not throwaways: teaching practical software maintenance in a software engineering course. In Proceedings of the 45th ACM technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE ‘14). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 55–60.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/2538862.2538965>

  3. Leo Porter and Beth Simon. 2013. Retaining nearly one-third more majors with a trio of instructional best practices in CS1. In Proceeding of the 44th ACM technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE ‘13). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 165–170.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/2445196.2445248>

  4. Jeremy Andrus and Jason Nieh. 2012. Teaching operating systems using android. In Proceedings of the 43rd ACM technical symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘12). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 613–618.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/2157136.2157312>

  5. Guillaume Marceau, Kathi Fisler, and Shriram Krishnamurthi. 2011. Measuring the effectiveness of error messages designed for novice programmers. In Proceedings of the 42nd ACM technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE ‘11). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 499–504.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/1953163.1953308>

Best Papers for Computing Education Research

  1. Eric J. Mayhew and Elizabeth Patitsas. 2023. Critical Pedagogy in Practice in the Computing Classroom. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1076–1082.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569840>

  2. Rachel Harred, Tiffany Barnes, Susan R. Fisk, Bita Akram, Thomas W. Price, and Spencer Yoder. 2023. Do Intentions to Persist Predict Short-Term Computing Course Enrollments: A Scale Development, Validation, and Reliability Analysis. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1062–1068.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569875>

  3. Geoffrey L. Herman, Shan Huang, Peter A. Peterson, Linda Oliva, Enis Golaszewski, and Alan T. Sherman. 2023. Psychometric Evaluation of the Cybersecurity Curriculum Assessment. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 228–234.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569762>

  4. Juho Leinonen, Francisco Enrique Vicente Castro, and Arto Hellas. 2022. Time-on-Task Metrics for Predicting Performance. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 871–877.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499359>

  5. Sophia Krause-Levy, Sander Valstar, Leo Porter, and William G. Griswold. 2022. A Demographic Analysis on Prerequisite Preparation in an Advanced Data Structures Course. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 661–667.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499337>

  6. Jayne Everson, F. Megumi Kivuva, and Amy J. Ko. 2022. A Key to Reducing Inequities in Like, AI, is by Reducing Inequities Everywhere First: Emerging Critical Consciousness in a Co-Constructed Secondary CS Classroom. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 209–215.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499395>

  7. Max Fowler and Craig Zilles. 2021. Superficial Code-guise: Investigating the Impact of Surface Feature Changes on Students’ Programming Question Scores. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 3–9.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432413>

  8. Yolanda A. Rankin, Jakita O. Thomas, and Sheena Erete. 2021. Real Talk: Saturated Sites of Violence in CS Education. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 802–808.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432432>

  9. Catherine Mooney and Brett A. Becker. 2021. Investigating the Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Computing Students’ Sense of Belonging. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 612–618.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432407>

  10. Valdemar Švábenský, Jan Vykopal, and Pavel Čeleda. 2020. What Are Cybersecurity Education Papers About? A Systematic Literature Review of SIGCSE and ITiCSE Conferences. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 2–8.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366816>

  11. Jeremiah Blanchard, Christina Gardner-McCune, and Lisa Anthony. 2020. Dual-Modality Instruction and Learning: A Case Study in CS1. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 818–824.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366865>

  12. An Nguyen and Colleen M. Lewis. 2020. Competitive Enrollment Policies in Computing Departments Negatively Predict First-Year Students’ Sense of Belonging, Self-Efficacy, and Perception of Department. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 685–691.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366805>

  13. Soohyun Nam Liao, Daniel Zingaro, Christine Alvarado, William G. Griswold, and Leo Porter. 2019. Exploring the Value of Different Data Sources for Predicting Student Performance in Multiple CS Courses. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 112–118.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287407>

  14. James Prather, Raymond Pettit, Brett A. Becker, Paul Denny, Dastyni Loksa, Alani Peters, Zachary Albrecht, and Krista Masci. 2019. First Things First: Providing Metacognitive Scaffolding for Interpreting Problem Prompts. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 531–537.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287374>

  15. Ayaan M. Kazerouni, Clifford A. Shaffer, Stephen H. Edwards, and Francisco Servant. 2019. Assessing Incremental Testing Practices and Their Impact on Project Outcomes. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 407–413.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287366>

Best Papers for Experience Reports and Tools

  1. Bailey Flanigan, Ananya A. Joshi, Sara McAllister, and Catalina Vajiac. 2023. CS-JEDI: Required DEI Education, by CS PhD Students, for CS PhD Students. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 87–93.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569733>

  2. Gloria Ashiya Katuka, Yvonika Auguste, Yukyeong Song, Xiaoyi Tian, Amit Kumar, Mehmet Celepkolu, Kristy Elizabeth Boyer, Joanne Barrett, Maya Israel, and Tom McKlin. 2023. A Summer Camp Experience to Engage Middle School Learners in AI through Conversational App Development. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 813–819.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569864>

  3. Lisa Zhang, Bogdan Simion, Michael Kaler, Amna Liaqat, Daniel Dick, Andi Bergen, Michael Miljanovic, and Andrew Petersen. 2023. Embedding and Scaling Writing Instruction Across First- and Second-Year Computer Science Courses. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 610–616.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569729>

  4. Jiameng Du, Yifan Song, Mingxiao An, Marshall An, Christopher Bogart, and Majd Sakr. 2022. Cheating Detection in Online Assessments via Timeline Analysis. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 98–104.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499368>

  5. Jan Vykopal, Valdemar Švábenský, Pavel Seda, and Pavel Čeleda. 2022. Preventing Cheating in Hands-on Lab Assignments. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 78–84.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499420>

  6. Wengran Wang, Audrey Le Meur, Mahesh Bobbadi, Bita Akram, Tiffany Barnes, Chris Martens, and Thomas Price. 2022. Exploring Design Choices to Support Novices’ Example Use During Creative Open-Ended Programming. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 619–625.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499374>

  7. Audrey Rorrer, Breauna Spencer, Sloan Davis, Sepi Hejazi Moghadam, Deborah Holmes, and Cori Grainger. 2021. Understanding Immersive Research Experiences that Build Community, Equity, and Inclusion. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 149–155.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432523>

  8. Andrew Begel, James Dominic, Conner Phillis, Thomas Beeson, and Paige Rodeghero. 2021. How a Remote Video Game Coding Camp Improved Autistic College Students’ Self-Efficacy in Communication. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 142–148.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432516>

  9. Julia M. Markel and Philip J. Guo. 2021. Inside the Mind of a CS Undergraduate TA: A Firsthand Account of Undergraduate Peer Tutoring in Computer Labs. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 502–508.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432533>

  10. Jessica Young Schmidt. 2020. Reviewing CS1 Materials through a Collaborative Software Engineering Exercise: An Experience Report. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 379–385.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366932>

  11. Jennifer Tsan, Jessica Vandenberg, Zarifa Zakaria, Joseph B. Wiggins, Alexander R. Webber, Amanda Bradbury, Collin Lynch, Eric Wiebe, and Kristy Elizabeth Boyer. 2020. A Comparison of Two Pair Programming Configurations for Upper Elementary Students. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 346–352.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366941>

  12. Tracy Camp, Christine Liebe, and Michelle Slattery. 2020. Applying NCWIT Protocol to Broaden Participation in Computing: A Case Study of CS@Mines. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 528–534.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366958>

  13. Joel C. Adams, Elizabeth R. Koning, and Christiaan D. Hazlett. 2019. Visualizing Classic Synchronization Problems: Dining Philosophers, Producers-Consumers, and Readers-Writers. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 934–940.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287467>

  14. Andreas Stefik, Richard E. Ladner, William Allee, and Sean Mealin. 2019. Computer Science Principles for Teachers of Blind and Visually Impaired Students. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 766–772.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287453>

  15. Janet Davis and Samuel A. Rebelsky. 2019. Developing Soft and Technical Skills Through Multi-Semester, Remotely Mentored, Community-Service Projects. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 29–35.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287508>

Best Papers for Position Papers and Curriculum Initiatives

  1. Muwei Zheng, Nathan Swearingen, Steven Mills, Croix Gyurek, Matt Bishop, and Xukai Zou. 2023. Case Study: Mapping an E-Voting Based Curriculum to CSEC2017. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 514–520.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569811>

  2. Brett A. Becker, Paul Denny, James Finnie-Ansley, Andrew Luxton-Reilly, James Prather, and Eddie Antonio Santos. 2023. Programming Is Hard - Or at Least It Used to Be: Educational Opportunities and Challenges of AI Code Generation. In Proceedings of the 54th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2023). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 500–506.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3545945.3569759>

  3. Veronica Catete, Amy Isvik, and Marnie Hill. 2022. A Framework for Socially-Relevant Service-Learning Internship Experiences for High School Students. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 815–821.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499355>

  4. Kathryn Cunningham, Yike Qiao, Alex Feng, and Eleanor O’Rourke. 2022. Bringing “High-level” Down to Earth: Gaining Clarity in Conversational Programmer Learning Goals. In Proceedings of the 53rd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education V. 1 (SIGCSE 2022). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 551–557.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3478431.3499370>

  5. Mariam Salloum, Daniel Jeske, Wenxiu Ma, Vagelis Papalexakis, Christian Shelton, Vassilis Tsotras, and Shuheng Zhou. 2021. Developing an Interdisciplinary Data Science Program. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 509–515.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432454>

  6. Aleata Hubbard Cheuoua. 2021. Confronting Inequities in Computer Science Education: A Case for Critical Theory. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 425–430.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432453>

  7. Raymond W. Blaine, Jean R. S. Blair, Christa M. Chewar, Rob Harrison, James J. Raftery, and Edward Sobiesk. 2021. Creating a Multifarious Cyber Science Major. In Proceedings of the 52nd ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘21). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1205–1211.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3408877.3432462>

  8. Joel C. Adams. 2020. Creating a Balanced Data Science Program. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 185–191.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366800>

  9. Abhijeet Agnihotri, Matthew O’Kelly, Rahul Mangharam, and Houssam Abbas. 2020. Teaching Autonomous Systems at 1/10th-scale: Design of the F1/10 Racecar, Simulators and Curriculum. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 657–663.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366796>

  10. Paul Goldenberg, June Mark, Brian Harvey, Al Cuoco, and Mary Fries. 2020. Design Principles behind Beauty and Joy of Computing. In Proceedings of the 51st ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ‘20). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 220–226.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3328778.3366794>

  11. Austin Cory Bart, Allie Sarver, Michael Friend, and Larry Cox II. 2019. PythonSneks: An Open-Source, Instructionally-Designed Introductory Curriculum with Action-Design Research. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 307–313.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287428>

  12. Heather Pon-Barry, Audrey St. John, Becky Wai-Ling Packard, and Barbara Rotundo. 2019. A Flexible Curriculum for Promoting Inclusion through Peer Mentorship. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 1116–1122.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287434>

  13. Cynthia Taylor and Saheel Sakharkar. 2019. ’);DROP TABLE textbooks;–: An Argument for SQL Injection Coverage in Database Textbooks. In Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE ’19). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 191–197.
    DOI:<https://doi.org/10.1145/3287324.3287429>

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outstanding.yml (↑ top)

  1. 2024: Michael Caspersen, For far-reaching and long-lasting contributions in computing education research in areas including curriculum development and teacher education; pioneering efforts in establishing computing curricula in Europe and globally; and high-level and impactful policy work on developing and expanding computing programs in schools.
  2. 2023: Susan Rodger, For creating JFLAP, changing how the automata course is taught; and for helping to bring computing to primary and secondary schools through her work with the Alice environment.
  3. 2022: Barbara Ericson, For developing, evaluating, and disseminating methods to make computing education more effective, efficient, and accessible, and for national leadership in computing education measurement and public policy.
  4. 2021: Stephen Edwards, For innovating automated feedback systems with Web-CAT, transforming software testing within computer science curricula, and exemplifying leadership in the computer science education research community.
  5. 2020: Lauri Malmi, For leadership in building the international computing education research community, and raising the profile and quality of computing education research and research mentorship.
  6. 2019: Mark Guzdial, For helping to create the field of computing education research, designing and evaluating innovative curricula and pedagogical methods, mentoring the field, and promoting computing as a literacy for all.
  7. 2018: Tim Bell, For significant and lasting impact on computing education internationally through the development of innovative resources and activities, such as “CS Unplugged”, that inspire and engage students and teachers at all educational levels.
  8. 2017: Gail Chapman, For long term impact on computer science education through the creation of curriculum, teacher professional development, and fierce advocacy for social equity in all computing classrooms.
  9. 2016: Jan Cuny, For her vision and principled leadership that has transformed computer science education and has moved the United States closer to making computing education accessible to everyone.
  10. 2015: Mark Allen Weiss, For authoring textbooks that have had a profound impact on generations of students and for invaluable service to the computer science education community.
  11. 2014: Robert Panoff, For promoting student enrichment, curriculum development, faculty enhancement, and infusing computational thinking at all levels through Shodor and the National Computational Science Institute.
  12. 2013: Michael Kölling, For the development of novel programming teaching tools, teaching approaches and teaching material.
  13. 2012: Harold (Hal) Abelson, For improving not only the way we teach computing by his contributions to Logo, App Inventor, and his textbook authorship but also the way we view knowledge in the broader society, through his leadership with the Free Software and Open Educational Resources movements and his founding efforts with the Creative Commons initiative.
  14. 2011: Matthias Felleisen, For the creation of a design-focused introductory curriculum, for educational outreach programs for K-12, and for many PhD students who continue to merge programming language research and education.
  15. 2010: Sally Fincher, For outstanding contributions to computing education research and inspiring a generation of computing education researchers.
  16. 2009: Elliot Koffman, For an extraordinary record of teaching, curriculum development, publishing papers as well as numerous textbooks, and for helping to shape Computer Science education.
  17. 2008: Randy Pausch, For being an inspirational leader in building programs and environments blending art with science and motivating a world of learners to realize their dreams.
  18. 2007: John Hughes, In memory of his forty years contribution to computing education, academic leadership and research in Australasia and internationally. He was an outstanding mentor of students and colleagues and a committed educator.
  19. 2007: Judith Gal-Ezer, Outstanding researcher and curriculum designer who has carried out pioneering work involving teaching the essence of computer science on both the high school and university levels.
  20. 2006: Richard Pattis, More than two decades of innovation and influence in providing thoughtful, profound, and concrete examples of teaching and thinking about algorithmic problem solving and programming.
  21. 2005: Kim Bruce, Innovative teaching methods, textbook authorship. Leadership in Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium and its curricular recommendations to Curriculum 91 and Curriculum 2001.
  22. 2004: Mordechai Ben-Ari, Textbook author, mentor and pedagogical researcher at both the university and pre-college levels, in concurrency, formal methods, and programming languages.
  23. 2003: Eric Roberts, Master teacher, advocate for computer science education, emissary to underrepresented populations in computer science. Principle editor and co-chair of the seminal document “Computing Curriculum 2001”.
  24. 2002: Elliot Soloway, Pioneering Computer Science Education researcher, master teacher, and eloquent spokesman for educational reform involving computing to our computing colleagues and world at large.
  25. 2001: Allen B. Tucker, Author areas of programming languages, natural language processing, and computer science education. Co-chaired the ACM/IEEE Joint Curriculum Task Force that developed Computing Curricula 1991, co-author of the 1986 Liberal Arts Model Curriculum in Computer Science, Editor-in-Chief of the 1997 CRC Handbook of Computer Science and Engineering.
  26. 2000: Andries van Dam, Prolific author, researcher , hypertext pioneer and a champion of computing education for many year., founding faculty member of Brown University Computer Science Department.
  27. 1999: Peter Denning, For his efforts in developing a scientific core for operating systems, in formulating a curriculum through the “Denning Report”, and in elucidating Computer Science to the broader scientific community.
  28. 1998: William Wulf, Contributions to the advancement of Computer Science Education in engineering.
  29. 1997: Andrew Tannenbaum, For seminal textbooks in networks, computer organization and operating systems, outstanding wit and educational leadership.
  30. 1996: Nell Dale, Prolific author for introductory computer science textbooks and contributions to the field of computer science education research.
  31. 1995: Robert Aiken, Outstanding mentor, advocate of computer science and technology education both in the United States and abroad.
  32. 1994: Norman Gibbs, Contribution to Software Engineering Education, first director of the Software Engineering Institute, co-founder Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium.
  33. 1993: Alan Kay, Contributions to Smalltalk programming languages, research development of computers usable by children.
  34. 1992: Daniel McCracken, Author of numerous best-selling books on Fortran, COBOL and other languages and their profound influence on today’s computer science teachers.
  35. 1991: David Gries, Contributions to Computer Science Education through textbooks and teaching enabling critical thinking, formal methods and the application of logic to the discipline.
  36. 1990: Curriculum ‘68 Committee, For their work on the seminal document leading the way for the founding of a multitude of computer science departments and providing guidance to the formation of courses and production of textbooks.
  37. 1989: Edsger Dijkstra, For providing clarity about programs through his letter “GOTO Considered Harmful” and writings on structured programming and the effects of these works on the emergence of formal methods as integral to computer science education.
  38. 1988: Grace Murray Hopper, Pioneering work in compiler design (Cobol), oversaw the Navy’s efforts to maintain uniformity in programming languages over two decades, master teacher who reminded us to watch our nanoseconds.
  39. 1987: Niklaus Wirth, For the development of a series of programming languages mainly for use in education chief among them Pascal. These languages continue to have a profound effect on the teaching of programming and on computer science in general.
  40. 1986: Donald Knuth, Author of influential series the “Art of Computer Programming” and his continuing contributions including TeX publication tool.
  41. 1985: Elliot Organick, Founder of SIGCSE, author and disseminator of the MULTICS operating system, author of several widely disseminated textbooks in programming languages and first computer courses.
  42. 1983: Karl Karlstrom, Book editor who piloted some 500 books on computer science through the publication process at a time when a senior editor said “I have traveled the length and breadth of this country and talked with the best people, and I can assure you that data processing is a fad that won’t last out the year.”
  43. 1982: Alan Perlis, Contributions to education, especially through his work on programming languages and compiler construction.
  44. 1981: William Atchison, Head of ACM Curriculum Committee that produced Curriculum ‘68, founding leader of University of Maryland Computer Science Department. ↑ Back to top

lifetime.yml (↑ top)

  1. 2024: Chris Stephenson, For outstanding lifelong service to K-16+ computing education, making indelible contributions to support computer science educators, establishing computing education standards, and developing computing curricula that will continue to impact generations of children to come.
  2. 2023: Renée McCauley, For more than two decades of exemplary service to SIGCSE, the computing education community and ACM; her mentoring and encouragement to others; and her leadership in increasing the global impact of SIGCSE.
  3. 2022: Simon, For exemplary service to the international computing education community through his tireless dedication to conference organisation, and his generous mentoring and leadership in research and education.
  4. 2021: Cary Laxer, For his profound and impactful service to SIGCSE, his positive impact on computer science education, his ongoing support of SIGCSE conferences, and for being an inspiration, a mentor, and a friend to all.
  5. 2020: Alison Clear, For sustained commitment and dedication to computing educators, computing education, excellence in teaching and research and innovative curriculum design nationally and internationally.
  6. 2019: Gloria Childress Townsend, For seventeen years of dedicated service to ACM’s Council on Women in Computing, while transforming her vision for ACM Celebrations into a global project that supports thousands of women around the world.
  7. 2018: Eric Roberts, For outstanding service to computing education, making significant contributions to computing curricula and pedagogy, and generously sharing his knowledge and wisdom through mentoring and guidance to others in the computing education community.
  8. 2017: Mats Daniels, For more than two decades of dedicated service to computing education research, building and supporting the international network of computing educators.
  9. 2016: Barbara Boucher Owens, For her extraordinary record of service to the computing education community for working relentlessly to grow the effectiveness of SIGCSE as a global leader in computer education and for being an inspiration, a mentor, and a friend to all.
  10. 2015: Frank Young, For over 40 years of service to the computing education community that exemplifies the term “lifetime service” and for serving as a role model and mentor to generations of students and faculty.
  11. 2014: Andrea Lawrence, For dedication to the computing education community, serving as a role model and mentor to students and faculty, improving diversity in computing education, making computing education available to everyone, and for helping students and faculty to “Find a way or make one”.
  12. 2013: Henry Walker, For dedication to the computing education community, including within SIGCSE and APCS, development of curricula and pedagogy, authoring a articles and textbooks, creation and support of conference submission software, mentoring of students and faculty, and consulting with departments to advance excellence in computing education.
  13. 2012: Jane Prey, For her love of and dedication to the computing education community – academic, industry, government and professional societies; and for her tireless efforts in encouraging more students, especially women, to pursue education and careers in computing.
  14. 2011: Gordon Davies, For many years of valuable and generous service to the computing education community including contributions through active membership on international committees, working groups, and conference program committees.
  15. 2010: Peter J. Denning, For forty years of exceptional service in industry and academia that stimulated a combined synergy which promoted educational excellence in software engineering and computing curricula.
  16. 2009: Michael Clancy, For thirty years of outstanding, lasting contributions and research in computer science education: “Oh Pascal!”, case studies, AP leadership, lab-based instruction, self-paced innovation, and mentoring.
  17. 2008: Dennis J. Frailey, For forty years of exceptional service in industry and academia that stimulated a combined synergy which promoted educational excellence in software engineering and computing education.
  18. 2007: John Impagliazzo, For extraordinary services to computing education, with particular contributions to the SIGCSE Bulletin, to international conferences on computing history, to accreditation leadership, and to curricula development.
  19. 2006: Joyce Currie Little, In honor of her service on the SIGCSE Board, the ACM Education Board, numerous conference committees; and for her contributions to computing in two year colleges, to certification and to professionalism in the discipline.
  20. 2005: Andrew McGettrick, For outstanding service and direction to the computing community in the UK and abroad. Member ACM Education Board, membership and significant influence on CC2001 final report, author of Report on Benchmark Levels for Computing, November 2000 Report on Benchmark Levels for Computing.
  21. 2004: Bruce Klein, Recognized for exemplary service to ACM, extraordinary commitment to SIGCSE, mentoring of SIGCSE members. ACM SIG Board task forces, ACM Education Board, SIGCSE Executive Board 2001 to 2007 as chair and past chair, past ITiCSE Conference and Technical Symposium chair, program committees.
  22. 2003: Harriet Taylor, Creative leader, researcher, supportive teacher. Past SIGCSE officer, representative to NECC, contributor to National Educational Technology Standards, UNESCO informatics curriculum, ISTE project for accreditation in technology for NCATE, the accreditation body for Colleges of Education, chair or program chair of numerous other education related conferences.
  23. 2002: A. Joe Turner, Dedication to students, colleagues and the profession both in the United States and abroad. Chair or officer in: ACM, ACM Education Board, Curriculum ‘91 Task Force, Computer Science Accreditation Board, IFIP Working Group 3.2 (University Informatics Education), National Educational Computing Association.
  24. 2001: Lillian N. (Boots) Cassel, Past chair of SIGCSE, and its Technical Symposium, leader in computer science accreditation, tireless advocate for computer science education supporting both faculty and students.
  25. 2000: James Miller, Tireless editor of the SIGCSE Bulletin 1982-1997.
  26. 1999: Bob Aiken, Service to SIGCSE, ACM-IFIPS, leader of several Computer Science People-to-People exchanges, dedicated mentor, and advocate for computer science in education both in the US and abroad.
  27. 1998: Della Bonnette, Past chair of SIGCSE and Technical Symposium chair, editor of the SIGCSE bulletin, leadership in accreditation including chairing CSAC, years on CSAB Board of Directors, ACM SIG Board, area director.
  28. 1997: Dick Austing, Editor on several curriculum recommendation documents in almost every area of computer science, including Curriculum ‘78, 2-year Task Force Report. Service as registrar for many SIGCSE conferences both before and after computerized registration. SIGCSE Technical Symposium chair. Founding ACM Fellow.” ↑ Back to top

broadening.yml (↑ top)

  1. 2024: Jandelyn (Jan) Plane, For spearheading many efforts in developing programs at both K12 and university levels in improving student opportunity and diversity in computing; building capacity through educator and curriculum development across Africa and the Middle East; and her work at the local and state levels in the USA in promoting diversity in computing. ↑ Back to top

testoftime.yml (↑ top)

  1. 2024: Evaluating a new exam question: Parsons problems, Paul Denny, Andrew Luxton-Reilly, and Beth Simon. 2008. Evaluating a new exam question: Parsons problems. In Proceedings of the Fourth international Workshop on Computing Education Research (ICER ‘08). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 113–124. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/1404520.1404532

  2. 2022: Connecting K-16 Curriculum & Policy: Making Computer Science Engaging, Accessible, and Hospitable for Underrepresented Students, Joanna Goode. 2010. Connecting K-16 Curriculum & Policy: Making Computer Science Engaging, Accessible, and Hospitable for Underrepresented Students. In Proceedings of the 41st ACM technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE ‘10). Association for Computing Machinery, New York, NY, USA, 22–26. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/1734263.1734272

  3. 2021: The incredible shrinking pipeline, Tracy Camp. 1997. The incredible shrinking pipeline. Communications of the ACM. 40, 10 (Oct. 1997), 103–110. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/262793.262813

  4. 2020: An object-oriented program development environment for the first programming course, Michael Kölling and John Rosenberg. 1996. An object-oriented program development environment for the first programming course. In Proceedings of the twenty-seventh SIGCSE technical symposium on Computer science education (SIGCSE ‘96), Karl J. Klee (Ed.). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 83-87. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/236452.236514

↑ Back to top

travelgrants.yml (↑ top)

  1. 2022: Tatiana Anderson, College of Staten Island, USA
  2. 2022: Tisha Brown-Gaines, Belmont University, USA
  3. 2022: Henry Chai, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
  4. 2022: Yada Chuengsatiansup, University of California, San Diego, USA
  5. 2022: Lasanthi Gamage, Webster University, USA
  6. 2022: Joseph Helsing, Muhlenberg College, USA
  7. 2022: Dara Jaiyeola, Hampden-Sydney College, USA
  8. 2022: Bill Kerney, Clovis Community College, USA
  9. 2022: Yolanda Lozano, La Cueva High School/Computer Science Alliance, USA
  10. 2022: Amanda O’Farrell, TU Dublin, Ireland
  11. 2022: Carolina Moreira Oliveira, Federal University of Paraná (UFPR), Brazil
  12. 2022: Marcelo Pias, Federal University of Rio Grande - FURG, Brazil
  13. 2022: Leila Ribeiro, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  14. 2022: Dana Zhang, Vanderbilt University, USA
  15. 2020: Anagha Kulkarni, San Francisco State University, USA
  16. 2020: Audrey Coats, Lynnfield High School, USA
  17. 2020: Charity Freeman, Kenwood Academy High School, USA
  18. 2020: Dan Stone, Lane Tech High School, USA
  19. 2020: Eric J. Rapos, Miami University, USA
  20. 2020: Jean Carlo Rossa Hauck, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil
  21. 2020: Jessica Johnsen, New Mexico Highlands University, USA
  22. 2020: Joel Sweatte, East Carolina University, USA
  23. 2020: Kathryn Roznai, World Language High School, USA
  24. 2020: Loren Ayresman, King Kekaulike High School, USA
  25. 2020: Nathalia da Cruz Alves, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil
  26. 2020: Neda Blackburn, Garrison Forest School, USA
  27. 2020: Nicholas Stoyas, Chicago Public Schools, USA
  28. 2020: Roisin Faherty, TU Dublin - Tallaght Campus, Ireland
  29. 2020: Sabiha Yeni, University of Leiden, The Netherlands
  30. 2020: Simone C. dos Santos Lima, UFPE, Brazil
  31. 2020: Tobias Wrigstad, Uppsala University, Sweden
  32. 2020: Viraj Kumar, Indian Institute of Science, India
  33. 2020: William Marsland, San Francisco Unified School District, USA
  34. 2019: Dewan Tanvir Ahmed, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
  35. 2019: Kristof Aldenderfer, American University, USA
  36. 2019: Mark Allison, University of Michigan – Flint, USA
  37. 2019: Jared Amalong, Sacramento County Office of Education, USA
  38. 2019: Amadeo Argüelles, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico
  39. 2019: Dennis Asamoah Owusu, Ashesi University, Ghana
  40. 2019: Jakob Barnard, University of Jamestown, USA
  41. 2019: Sherrene Bogle, Humboldt State University, USA
  42. 2019: Emily Burkett, Sheffield Junior High School, USA
  43. 2019: Vasanta Chaganti, Swarthmore College, USA
  44. 2019: Yisong Chang, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  45. 2019: Qiong Cheng, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
  46. 2019: Barun Dandapat, Rowan College at Gloucester County, USA
  47. 2019: Kristin Davidson, University of Mississippi, USA
  48. 2019: Ray DiVenuto, St. Joseph’s College, USA
  49. 2019: JonAlf Dyrland-Weaver, Stuyvesant High School, USA
  50. 2019: Daniel Ellsworth, Colorado College, USA
  51. 2019: Adam Gaweda, NC State University, USA
  52. 2019: Sara Ghadami, California State University of Fullerton / Orange Coast College, USA
  53. 2019: Olga Glebova, Georgia State University, USA
  54. 2019: Mark Gondree, Sonoma State University, USA
  55. 2019: Bo Gorcesky, Horry County Schools, USA
  56. 2019: Deborah Gray, Alabama School of Math and Science, USA
  57. 2019: Grant Hutchison, Malvern Collegiate Institute, Canada
  58. 2019: Andrea E Johnson, Spelman College, USA
  59. 2019: Angie Kalthoff, ISD 742 St.Cloud Area School District, USA
  60. 2019: David Largent, Ball State University, USA
  61. 2019: Sa Liu, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, USA
  62. 2019: Lauren Margulieux, Georgia State University, USA
  63. 2019: Chao Mbogo, Kenya Methodist University, Kenya
  64. 2019: Karina Mochetti, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil
  65. 2019: Niema Moshiri, University of California, San Diego, USA
  66. 2019: Jaye Nias, Spelman College, USA
  67. 2019: Hyesung Park, Georgia Gwinnett College, USA
  68. 2019: Nea Pirttinen, University of Helsinki, Finland
  69. 2019: Keith Quille, TU Dublin, Tallaght Campus, Ireland
  70. 2019: Audrey Rorrer, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
  71. 2019: Jeremy Sarachan, St. John Fisher College, USA
  72. 2019: Sharif Mohammad Shahnewaz Ferdous, The College of New Jersey, USA
  73. 2019: Ben Rydal Shapiro, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
  74. 2019: Bonita Sharif, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, USA
  75. 2019: Shubbhi Taneja, Sonoma State University, USA
  76. 2019: Eleson Tanton, Admiral Moorer Middle School, USA
  77. 2019: Ann Thomas, Lafayette County School District, USA
  78. 2019: Pamela Thompson, Catawba College, USA
  79. 2019: Farah Tokmic, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
  80. 2019: Kim W. Tracy, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, USA
  81. 2019: Yongge Wang, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
  82. 2019: Pamela Wiese, Mt Hood Community College, USA
  83. 2019: Shirley Harriet Yera Surender, Faulkner University, USA
  84. 2018: Debasis Bhattacharya, University of Hawaii Maui College, USA
  85. 2018: Sharon Dearman, Bishop Moore Catholic High School, USA
  86. 2018: Huseyin Ergin, Ball State University, USA
  87. 2018: Francisco J. Gutierrez, University of Chile, Chile
  88. 2018: Jeffrey Hemmes, Regis University, USA
  89. 2018: Anamary Leal, Sonoma State University, USA
  90. 2018: Erik Saule, UNC Charlotte, USA
  91. 2018: Jorge Reyes Silveyra, Muhlenberg College, USA
  92. 2018: Vinitha Hannah Subburaj, West Texas A&M University, USA
  93. 2017: Jennifer Reese, Seguin HS, USA
  94. 2017: Anna Ritz, Reed College, USA
  95. 2017: Gina Sprint, Washington State University, USA
  96. 2017: Eliana Valenzuela-Andrade, University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo (UPR-Arecibo), Puerto Rico
  97. 2017: Evelyn Zayas, One Schoolhouse, USA
  98. 2017: Michael Zamansky, Hunter College, USA
  99. 2016: Joshua Eckroth, Stetson University, USA
  100. 2016: Shawn Kenner, Sharon High School, USA
  101. 2016: Brian Schott, Bronx Academy for Software Engineering, USA
  102. 2016: Marco Aurélio Graciotto Silva, Federal University of Technology – Paraná, Brazil
  103. 2016: Raymond Wallace, University of New Hampshire – Manchester, USA
  104. 2015: Daniel Fokum, The University of the West Indies, Jamaica
  105. 2015: Dimitris Papmichail, The College of New Jersey, USA
  106. 2015: Yu Sun, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, USA
  107. 2015: Courtney Starrett, Winthrop University, New York, USA
  108. 2015: Narasimha Vajjhala, The University of New York Tirana, Albania
  109. 2015: Mark Zarb, Robert Gordon University, United Kingdom
  110. 2014: Meg Fryling, Siena College, USA
  111. 2014: Markus Geissler, Cosumnes River College, USA
  112. 2014: Carol Yarbrough, Alabama School of Fine Arts, USA ↑ Back to top

specialprojects.yml (↑ top)

  1. Title: Recipes for Resistance: A Multi-Modal Podcast Centering Justice, Joy, and Healing (2022)
    Authors: Victoria Chávez, Affiliation: Northwestern University, USA, Email:
    Briana Bettin, Affiliation: Michigan Tech, USA, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2022.
    Description:
    Files:

  2. Title: Towards Evidence Based Teaching of Entrepreneurship to Computer Science Students (2022)
    Authors: Jonathan Browning, Affiliation: Queen’s University Belfast, United Kingdom, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2022.
    Description:
    Files:

  3. Title: A participatory approach to integrating machine learning into core subjects: Evidence from in-service teachers (2022)
    Authors: Ismaila Sanusi, Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA, Email:
    Fred Martin, Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2022.
    Description:
    Files:

  4. Title: Develop Kahoot Interactive Lessons for AP CS Principles (2021)
    Authors: Evelyn Zayas, Affiliation: Rasmussen University, Melbourne, Florida, USA, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2021.
    Description: This project entails the development of Kahoot interactive lessons that AP CS teachers can assign to students to teach, reinforce, and assess important computer science and programming concepts. These interactive lessons will consist of terminology, a video to explain the concept(s), and checks for understanding in the form of multiple choice, true/false, and puzzle type questions.
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2021-Zayas.pdf
  5. Title: Git Utilities for Instructors and Education Researchers (2021)
    Authors: Nasser Giacaman, Affiliation: Department of Electrical, Computer, and Software Engineering University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2021.
    Description: This project aims to develop a web-based interface to make it easier for staff and students to use GiT repositories for educational purposes. The web application will allow mass-uploads, email all students, generate statistics and reports to analyse student data.
    Files:

  6. Title: Telling Our Narratives: Expanding Equity Within Computing Education (2021)
    Authors: Francisco Castro, Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Amherst, Email:
    Earl W. Huff Jr, Affiliation: Clemson University, Email:
    Gayithri Jayathirtha, Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Email:
    Yerika Jimenez, Affiliation: University of Florida, Email:
    Minji Kong, Affiliation: University of Delaware, Email:
    Natalie Araujo Melo, Affiliation: Northwestern University, Email:
    Amber Solomon, Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology, Email:
    Jennifer Tsan, Affiliation: University of Chicago, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2021.
    Description: This proposal seeks to elicit and revalue the experiences of members of the CEd community that are often forced to the margins, to unpack what issues of equity they face and their aspirations of a CEd space. In doing so, we aim to render their stories, contributions, and aspirations visible.
    Files:

  7. Title: Solve this! Problems of practice teachers face in K-12 CS Education (2021)
    Authors: Monica McGill, Affiliation: CSEdResearch.org, Email:
    Michelle Friend, Affiliation: University of Nebraska Omaha, Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2021.
    Description: The goal of this project is to identify and disseminate a robust inventory of the problems of practice that primary and secondary teachers experience when teaching computer science (CS) in order to guide the development of CS education research and professional development support.
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2021-McGill.pdf
  8. Title: In a Woman’s Voice: An Alternative Gamification of The Oregon Trail (2021)
    Authors: Stephany Coffman-Wolph, Affiliation: Ohio Northern University, Email:
    John K. Estell, Affiliation: Ohio Northern University, Email:
    Amount: $500, Date: November 2021.
    Description:
    Files:

  9. Title: Integrating Jupyter Notebooks with Runestone Interactive Using Doenet (2021)
    Authors: Melissa Lynn, Affiliation: Gustavus Adolphus College, Email:
    Brad Miller, Affiliation: Gustavus Adolphus College, Email:
    Duane Nykamp, Affiliation: Gustavus Adolphus College, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2021.
    Description:
    Files:

  10. Title: From Student to Working Computer Science and Software Engineering Professional: Bridging the Gap (2021)
    Authors: Jacqueline Whalley, Affiliation: Auckland University of Technology, Email:
    Tony Clear, Affiliation: Auckland University of Technology, Email:
    Stephen Thorpe, Affiliation: Auckland University of Technology, Email:
    Ramesh Lal, Affiliation: Auckland University of Technology, Email:
    Jim Buchan, Affiliation: Auckland University of Technology, Email:
    Amount: $4,808, Date: November 2021.
    Description:
    Files:

  11. Title: Teaching Accessibility for Fairness in AI Courses (2021)
    Authors: Yudong Liu, Affiliation: Western Washington University, Email:
    Yasmine Elglaly, Affiliation: Western Washington University, Email:
    Amount: $4,740, Date: November 2021.
    Description:
    Files:

  12. Title: Big Ideas of Cryptography (2020)
    Authors: Michael Lodi, Affiliation: Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy, Email:
    Marco Sbaraglia, Affiliation: Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy, Email:
    Simone Martini, Affiliation: Alma Mater Studiorum - Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy, Email:
    Amount: , Date: November 2020.
    Description: This project aims to build a “Principles of Cryptography” learning path, specifically designed for secondary school students.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2020-lodi.pdf
  13. Title: Developing criteria for K-12 learning resources in computer science that challenge stereotypes and promote diversity (2020)
    Authors: Sue Sentance, Affiliation: Raspberry Pi Foundation, Cambridge, UK, Email:
    Hayley Leonard, Affiliation: Raspberry Pi Foundation, Cambridge, UK, Email:
    Amount: , Date: November 2020.
    Description: This project aims to broaden participation in computing and address the needs of diverse learners in K-12 by developing a set of guidelines for teaching resources that are informed by culturally-responsive pedagogy.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2020-sentance.pdf
  14. Title: Student communication during group projects: Reporting on gender bias language (2020)
    Authors: Rita Garcia, Affiliation: University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia, Email:
    Amount: , Date: November 2020.
    Description: The goal of this project is to determine whether gender bias occurs during students’ group work communication that might build the barriers that female contributors experience while working on software projects.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2020-garcia.pdf
  15. Title: Decoding Doctoral Student Departure: Faculty and Student Perspectives (2019)
    Authors: Kari George, Affiliation: UCLA, USA, Email:
    Amount: $3,500, Date: May 2019.
    Description:
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-George.pdf
  16. Title: The Crossroads of Computer Science: Stories of ‘Sideways’ and ‘Hidden’ Computer Scientists (2019)
    Authors: Brett Becker, Affiliation: University College Dublin, Belfield, Ireland, Email:
    Amount: $4,785, Date: November 2019.
    Description:
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-Becker.pdf
  17. Title: An Online Tool for Easy-to-set-up and Auto-gradable Full Tracing Exercises (2019)
    Authors: Wei Jin, Affiliation: Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2019.
    Description: We propose a web-based system that allows instructors to set up auto-gradable full tracing exercises easily. We will utilize pythontutor.com, a popular open-source code visualization tool, as the underlying system. The augmented system will help engage students in the learning process by require students to determine which line is executed next and what happens in memory/output before the system demonstrates the step.
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-Jin.pdf
  18. Title: Mastery Learning in Programming Courses (2019)
    Authors: Matthias Hauswirth, Affiliation: Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), Lugano, Switzerland, Email:
    Amount: , Date: November 2019.
    Description: (This project was never performed due to interruption the covid pandemic had on our work patterns). We want to plant the seeds for a community of practice on Mastery Learning for Programming Courses, by making our lessons learned and resources available in an easily adoptable way.
    Files:

  19. Title: The Firsts: Exploring the Intersectional Experiences of Black Women in Computing Who Were First to be Conferred Ph.D.s in Computing/Computer Science at Colleges/Universities (2019)
    Authors: Jakita O. Thomas, Affiliation: Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA, Email:
    Yolanda A. Rankin, Affiliation: Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2019.
    Description: To the explore the intersectional experiences of Black Women in Computing who were the first complete a Ph.D. in Computing/Computer Science (C/CS) from their respective institutions (1980’s – present).
    Files:

  20. Title: A 50 year retrospective on academic integrity and computer ethics in CS Education (Special theme “SIGCSE: 50 Years and Beyond”) (2019)
    Authors: Nadia Najjar, Affiliation: University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA, Email:
    Mary Lou Maher, Affiliation: University of North Carolina, Charlotte, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2019.
    Description:
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-Najjar.pdf
  21. Title: Developing Ethics Modules for Core CS and DS Courses (2019)
    Authors: Lori Carter, Affiliation: Point Loma Nazarene University, USA, Email:
    Catherine Crockett, Affiliation: , Email:
    Whitney Featherston, Affiliation: , Email:
    Morgan Wheeler, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: $2,900, Date: May 2019.
    Description: Two professors and two students at Point Loma Nazarene University (PLNU) have been working for the last year to create a series of 10-20 minute ethics modules that can be integrated into core Computer Science and Data Science courses. This project is for focus groups to obtain student feedback on the new modules and for subsequent refinement.
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-Carter.pdf
  22. Title: Developing Physical Manipulatives and Games for Teaching Advanced Data Structures (2019)
    Authors: Mark Goadrich, Affiliation: Hendrix College, USA, Email:
    Amount: $4,598, Date: May 2019.
    Description: This project will develop engaging manipulatives specifically developed for physically demonstrating concepts in advanced data structures. Instructors will be able to use these tools to support lessons on sorting algorithms, binary search trees, heaps, sets, and hash tables.
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-Goadrich.pdf
  23. Title: Dive into Systems - A Free Online Textbook for Introductory Computer Systems Topics (2019)
    Authors: Tia Newall, Affiliation: Swarthmore College, USA, Email:
    Suzanne Matthews, Affiliation: , Email:
    Kevin C. Webb, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2019.
    Description: The purpose of this project is to develop and promote a free online textbook that covers introductory computer systems, architecture and parallel computing.
    Files:
    • Final report – SP-report-2019-Matthews.pdf
  24. Title: Developing Coding Instruction Videos for K12 Hearing Impaired Students Using American Sign Language (2019)
    Authors: Daniela Marghitu, Affiliation: Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA, Email:
    Amount: $3,500, Date: November 2019.
    Description: A number of ambitious projects such as ASLCORE 6 and ASLClear 7 are working on creating American Sign Language (ASL) signs for STEM disciplines. For example, in the computer science domain, ASLCORE has produced signs for concepts such as “Recursion”, “Debugger”, “Linked List” and “Variable”. In this way, computer science jargon is being made accessible to students who are hearing impaired. Drag and Drop coding applications such as MIT’s Scratch 8 are popularly used to teach K-12 students to code. Our project aims to make computer science concepts, using Block-based coding, a more inclusive experience for hearing impaired students.
    Files:

  25. Title: Active Learning Materials for Machine Learning (2018)
    Authors: Olga Glebova, Affiliation: Georgia State University, USA, Email:
    Pavel Skums, Affiliation: Georgia State University, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2018.
    Description: The applicants will develop, test and refine 12 sets of active learning materials for Machine Learning (ML) course suited for undergraduate students majoring in Computer Science (CS). Activities will follow POGIL (Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) methodology.
    Files:

  26. Title: Software History Examples (2018)
    Authors: Kim Tracy, Affiliation: Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2018.
    Description: Collection and development of important historical software examples to teach the history of software. Novel and interesting from historical perspective.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2018-tracy.pdf
  27. Title: Interactive resources for training CS TAs (2018)
    Authors: Colleen Lewis, Affiliation: Harvey Mudd College, USA, Email:
    Phillip Conrad, Affiliation: University of California, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2018.
    Description: A card game to help CS faculty create inclusive classrooms. Extension of existing game. A novel idea.
    Files:

  28. Title: Developing and Testing Activities Introducing Elementary School Students to Artificial Intelligence (2018)
    Authors: David Touretzky, Affiliation: Carnegie Mellon University, Email: dst@cs.cmu.edu
    Amount: $4,440, Date: June 2018.
    Description: Dr. Touretzky will develop hands-on activities designed to introduce elementary school children to artificial intelligence concepts. Activities will include topics such as computer vision, face and voice recognition, speech generation, navigation and robotics. The project will include twice-weekly instruction for over 300 elementary school children during academic year 2018-2019. Learning outcomes and student interest in AI will be measured. In addition, PowerPoint slides and supplementary materials will be developed for the classroom teachers. Materials will be cataloged in a resource directory supported by the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA).
    Files:

  29. Title: Code Control: Developing a Serious Game to Reinforce Introductory Programming Concepts (2018)
    Authors: Devorah Kletenik, Affiliation: Brooklyn College, City University of New York, Email: kletenik@sci.brooklyn.cuny.edu
    Deborah Sturm, Affiliation: College of Staten Island, City University of New York, Email: deborah.sturm@csi.cuny.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: June 2018.
    Description: Drs. Kletenik and Sturm will create a game to introduce programming concepts to undergraduate students. The game will include a storyline, sound effects, graphics, power-ups and short quiz-like challenges. It will provide students with an opportunity to practice their programming skills. The game is intended for a broad audience; gamers and non-gamers, females and underrepresented groups will be consulted during the creation of the game. In addition, a wide-scale evaluation of the effectiveness of the game will be performed. The game will be available as a WebGL and will be playable in a browser without downloading or installation. It will be released under a Free Software license, enabling others to modify the game if so desired.
    Files:
    • Interim Report – SP-interim-report-2018-Kletenik.pdf
    • Final Report – SPr-report-2020-Kletenik.pdf
  30. Title: CS Identity Development Interview Project (2018)
    Authors: Amanpreet Kapoor, Affiliation: University of Florida, Email: kapooramanpreet@ufl.edu
    Christina Gardner-McCune, Affiliation: University of Florida, Email:
    Amount: $3,078, Date: June 2018.
    Description: This project focuses on the development of professional identity in computer science students. Drs. Kapoor and Gardner-McCune will identify ways in which computer science students engage in communities of practice and will measure the amount of time students spend in professional experiences outside the classroom. The impact of these experiences on the development of professional identity will be explored through a qualitative study. The results of the study will include profiles of successful students and recommendations for faculty.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2018-kapoor.pdf
  31. Title: The CS-Ed Podcast (2018)
    Authors: Kristin Stephens-Martinez, Affiliation: Duke University, USA, Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2018.
    Description: 6 podcasts of best practices in computing education.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2018-Stephens-Martinez.pdf
  32. Title: An Analysis and Interpretation Framework for Student Engagement Benchmarking Data (2017)
    Authors: Michael Morgan, Affiliation: Monash University, AUS, Email: michael.morgan@monash.edu
    Matthew Butler, Affiliation: Monash University, AUS, Email: Matthew.Butler@monash.edu
    Jane Sinclair, Affiliation: Monash University, AUS, Email: J.E.Sinclair@warwick.ac.uk
    Chris Gonsalvez, Affiliation: Monash University, AUS, Email: Chris.Gonsalvez@monash.edu
    Amount: $4,800, Date: November 2017.
    Description: This project will provide a framework for analyzing benchmark data to improve student engagement in Computer Science. Currently there is no widely used systematic process to evaluate and interpret student engagement data. This project will develop an analysis framework which Computer Science departments can apply to their own data sets. Dr. Morgan’s team will analyze the data set for the Australian Student Experience Survey from 2012 to 2016, comparing the performance of Monash University Computer Science courses against the performance of Computer Science courses at other universities in Australia. Results will be interpreted through the lens of relevant student engagement literature. By performing this analysis, the project aims to provide other Computer Science educators with a framework for the analysis of benchmarking data such as the North American National Survey of Student Engagement, the United Kingdom Engagement Survey and similar instruments.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2017-morgan.pdf
  33. Title: Active Learning Materials for Computer Architecture and Organization (2017)
    Authors: Brandon Myers, Affiliation: University of Iowa, Email: brandon-d-myers@uiowa.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2017.
    Description: Dr. Myers will develop eight Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) activities for use in Computer Organization and Architecture classes. Exercises will be based on the learning outcomes defined in the 2013 ACM/IEEE Computer Science Curriculum Guidelines. POGIL is based on a theory of instruction which includes the learning cycle of exploration, term introduction, and application. The activities will be available to other instructors via cspogil.org.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2017-myers.pdf
  34. Title: Understanding Movement (2017)
    Authors: Amber Wagner, Affiliation: Birmingham-Southern College, Email: ankwagner@gmail.com
    Amount: $1,060, Date: May 2017.
    Description: Dr. Wagner will develop a project-based course for novice computer science students intended to demonstrate the relevance of computing. Inspired by ESPN’s Sport Science, students will combine physiology with computer science to build wearable devices to measure the force or speed of various movements. Assignments will be designed to use the Arduino 101 to collect and analyze movement data. For the final project, students will first determine the types of movements they wish to measure, and then they will build their wearables. With the help of an athletic trainer, they will assemble an analysis of the data to summarize the force and/or speed of the movements. A detailed curriculum guide will be published for use by other educators.
    Files:

  35. Title: Computing Educators Oral History Project (CEOHP) Growth - Awardee Interviews and Website Update (2017)
    Authors: Vicki Almstrum, Affiliation: , Email: almstrum@acm.org
    Barbara Boucher Owens, Affiliation: , Email: owensb@southwestern.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2017.
    Description: Drs. Almstrum and Owens plan to extend the collection of oral interviews documenting the history of computing educators. This project will increase the number of interviews with winners of the SIGCSE Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education Award and the SIGCSE Lifetime Service Award, with an emphasis on those who live in countries other than the United States. In addition, the project will entail a significant reworking of the CEOHP website which serves as a repository for the oral interviews.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-interim-report-2017-almstrum.pdf
  36. Title: How Do We Teach Debugging? (2017)
    Authors: Andrew Luxton-Reilly, Affiliation: University of Auckland, NZ, Email: andrew@cs.auckland.ac.nz
    Ewan Tempero, Affiliation: University of Auckland, NZ, Email: e.tempero@auckland.ac.nz
    Amount: $4,850, Date: November 2017.
    Description: Drs. Luxton-Reilly and Tempero will address the difficulties of teaching and learning debugging by undertaking a detailed study of existing resources. They will analyze debugging materials included in introductory textbooks after creating a taxonomy for analysis. After a rigorous search for online materials that teach debugging strategies, the authors will create an online repository. The repository will make it easier for instructors to locate appropriate resources and direct students to them. In addition, a literature review of research relating to teaching debugging to novices will be published.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2017-luxton-reilly.pdf
  37. Title: CQDR - Clicker Question Data Repository (2017)
    Authors: Jaime Spacco, Affiliation: Knox College, USA, Email: jspacco@knox.edu
    Amount: $4,000, Date: November 2017.
    Description: Dr. Spacco will expand and improve an online repository of clicker questions that have been used in courses using Peer Instruction. An existing website (peerinstruction4cs.org) has complete slide decks for multiple courses containing clicker questions. This project will result in the addition of information about the questions themselves including what percent of students answered the question correctly on the first and second votes; whether the question is an identical or modified version of a question used in a previous iteration of the course; whether a question was adopted from another instructor, and if so, whether it is identical or modified; and comments or suggestions from other PI instructors about the question. The data will help instructors to determine both the difficulty and the relative value of each clicker question. The repository will be publicly available.
    Files:

  38. Title: Making Block Languages Accessible (2016)
    Authors: Richard E. Ladner, Affiliation: University of Washington, Email: ladner@cs.washington.edu
    Amount: $4,064, Date: May 2016.
    Description: Block languages such as Scratch, Snap!, Alice, Blockly, App Inventor, ScratchJr, and others, have opened up programming and problem solving to millions of children worldwide. This project will make block languages accessible to blind children so they can have the same opportunities as their sighted peers. Most blind children in the US are already familiar with smartphones and tablets including the gestures used to navigate and spatially understand what is on a touchscreen. This project will extend the open source Blockly language by building on touchscreen phone applications.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2016-ladner.pdf
  39. Title: The Dawn of Computing: Charles Babbage and the Difference Engine (2016)
    Authors: Mark M. Meysenburg, Affiliation: Doane University, Email: mark.meysenburg@doane.edu
    Amount: $3,000, Date: May 2016.
    Description: Dr. Meysenburg will create a Reacting to the Past role-playing game, “The Dawn of Computing: Charles Babbage and the Difference Engine,” regarding British polymath Charles Babbage and his quest to build his difference engine. The game can be used in general-audience first-year seminar courses, to encourage students to study computing. Reacting to the Past games revolve around debate, with groups of students divided into factions aligned to different sides of the issue at hand. The central issue at stake in “The Dawn of Computing: Charles Babbage and the Difference Engine” will be whether or not Babbage should be awarded funds from the British government for the development of the difference engine, first in 1823 and then in an ongoing manner. The outcome will be in the hands of the students.
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2016-meysenburg.pdf
    • Instructors materials – SP-report-2016-meysenburg-instructors-materials.pdf
    • Instructors guide – SP-report-2016-meysenburg-instructors-guide.pdf
    • Gamebook – SP-report-2016-meysenburg-gamebook.pdf
  40. Title: What Exactly Are We Expecting Our Novice Programming Students to Achieve? (2016)
    Authors: Brett A. Becker, Affiliation: University College Dublin, Email: brett.becker@ucd.ie
    Amount: $4,700, Date: December 2016.
    Description: Dr. Brett Becker will collect, categorize and analyze the learning outcome statements of CS1 courses across a large, diverse set of institutions, providing an answer to the question: What exactly are we expecting our novice programming students to achieve? This will allow the CS education community to decide if, as recent evidence has suggested, we have unrealistic expectations of our CS1 students. The outputs of this research will provide a starting point for the CS education community to adjust its expectations of novice programmers, resulting in improvements in failure rates, retention, diversity and equity in CS education. Upon completion of the project an online repository of CS1 learning outcomes will be available to, and updatable by, the CS education community.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2016-becker.pdf
  41. Title: Inclusive Apps: Supporting Mobile Accessibility Standards through Educational Exercises (2016)
    Authors: Yasmine N. El-Glaly, Affiliation: Rochester Institute of Technology, Email: ynevse@rit.edu
    Daniel E. Krutz, Affiliation: Rochester Institute of Technology, Email: dxkvse@rit.edu
    Amount: $3,800, Date: December 2016.
    Description: Drs. El-Glaly and Krutz will create a publicly accessible oracle of mobile applications which will define problems relating to the accessibility of mobile applications for individuals with disabilities. The oracle will contain a library of well-defined accessibility problems, provide details about the accessibility issues, and demonstrate the difficulties experienced by users with different needs or who are differently abled. The oracle will outline steps to modify each application to make it accessible to users affected by the accessibility issue. The oracle will be available for use at other educational institutions to support software development and accessibility related courses.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2017-elglaly.pdf
  42. Title: A Tutoring System for Red Black Trees (2016)
    Authors: Chun Wai Liew, Affiliation: Lafayette College, Email: liewc@lafayette.edu
    Amount: $4,387, Date: May 2016.
    Description: A web based tutoring system will be developed to help students learn top-down insertion and deletion algorithms in balanced trees, specifically in red-black trees. The tutoring system will help students recognize the preconditions for single and double rotation transformations. The system will allow instructors to provide problems and will automatically generate solution paths.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2018-liew.pdf
  43. Title: OnRamp: An Interactive Learning Portal for Parallel Computing Environments (2015)
    Authors: Samantha Foley, Affiliation: University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Email: sfoley@uwlax.edu
    Joshua Hursey, Affiliation: University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Email: jhursey@uwlax.edu
    Amount: $3,777, Date: May 2015.
    Description: OnRamp to Parallel Computing, will provide a web-based portal designed to coach users through the often unfamiliar and complex system software, programming interfaces, and tools to roll out parallel computing environments. Interactive tutorials will teach faculty and students about the software ecosystem and parallel computing while allowing them to launch parallel applications from day one. As users become more comfortable with running parallel applications in parallel computing environments, the OnRamp portal will transform into a reference guide.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2015-foley.pdf
  44. Title: Development of a Software Engineering Process Improvement Game (2015)
    Authors: Bruce Maxim, Affiliation: University of Michigan-Dearborn, Email: bmaxim@umich.edu
    Amount: $3,200, Date: November 2015.
    Description: Serious games are gaining popularity as a means of instruction in higher education. Dr. Maxim will create a serious game that allows students to create agile process models and to experiment with process improvement practices. As a result of playing the game, students will discover the importance of engineering process improvement activities through the creation of virtual software products. The game tutorial level can be used as a lab activity and will provide motivation for studying software quality. Software engineering students will also use this game to gain practical project management experience.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2015-maxim.pdf
  45. Title: Supporting Education Using a Public Oracle of Vulnerable Mobile Apps (2015)
    Authors: Daniel Krutz, Affiliation: Rochester Institute of Technology, Email: dxkvse@rit.edu
    Amount: $2,400, Date: November 2015.
    Description: Dr. Krutz will create a publicly accessible oracle of mobile apps which contains well defined vulnerabilities, information about the vulnerabilities, and steps on how to exploit each vulnerability to demonstrate its negative ramifications. He will also provide steps to repair each vulnerability and the process to demonstrate the vulnerability has been repaired. This project will result in an oracle which can be used for educational activities at other institutions in a variety of mobile and security related courses.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2015-krutz.pdf
  46. Title: Git for People Who Actually Want to Learn Git (2015)
    Authors: David Musicant, Affiliation: Carleton College, Email: dmusican@carleton.edu
    Amount: $4,737, Date: November 2015.
    Description: The version control system Git (https://git-scm.com/) has become popular for developers who track and share code. Accordingly, Git has been making its way into computer science classrooms as well. Students are often challenged by the complexity of using Git. This project will result in a new Git client, Elegit. Elegit will provide a subset of Git commands and will help students understand Git’s organizational structure at a deep level. Elegit will also support features necessary to for instructors to organize projects and submissions.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2015-musicant.pdf
  47. Title: Low-cost Adaptation of Lego Serious Play to Teach Software Engineering (2015)
    Authors: Stanislav Kurkovsky, Affiliation: Central Connecticut State University, Email: kurkovsky@ccsu.edu
    Amount: $4,500, Date: May 2015.
    Description: Dr. Stanislav Kurkovsky will adapt the principles of Lego Serious Play for easy and cost-effective application in software engineering and related courses to promote active learning, boost creativity, and improve student engagement with the course material. Low cost Lego alternatives will be investigated. New and existing software engineering case studies will be tested with the alternative Lego set. Resulting curricular materials will be posted online, accompanied by detailed scripts, worksheets, grading rubrics, timing guidelines, practical tips and photos. Workshops will be offered to train faculty interesting in adopting these materials.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2015-kurkovsky.pdf
  48. Title: Evolving the Introductory Computing Sequence to be CSG-Ed Focused (2014)
    Authors: Michael Goldweber, Affiliation: , Email: mikeyg@cs.xu.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2014.
    Description: Computing curricula, particularly the introductory sequence, often reinforce student misconceptions regarding the discipline. Computer Science educational activities for the social good (CSG-Ed), is a term meant to incorporate any educational activity that endeavors to convey and reinforce computing’s social relevance and potential for positive societal impact. This project will evolve the computing curricula at five of New Zealand’s leading institutions to be significantly more CSG-Ed infused, particularly at the introductory level.
    Files:

  49. Title: Creating Successful Computing Clubs in NJ Middle and Elementary Schools (2014)
    Authors: Frances P. Trees, Affiliation: , Email: fran.trees@cs.rutgers.edu
    Amount: $4,300, Date: May 2014.
    Description: This project will provide professional development to 20 middle school and elementary school teachers in the area of computing concepts with the goals of having these teachers initiate a computer club or integrate computing concepts in their current curriculum. Professional development and ongoing support and mentoring will be provided. The ultimate goal is to involve these teachers in the creation a Computer Club Guidebook to present to NJ State Department of Education for implementation in other schools statewide. The Computer Club Guidebook will be available to others seeking to establish similar clubs.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2014-trees.pdf
  50. Title: Assessing the Potential of Evolved Parsons Puzzles as Compared to Their Instructor-designed Counterparts (2014)
    Authors: Alessio Gaspar, Affiliation: , Email: alessio@usf.edu
    Amruth Kumar, Affiliation: , Email: amruth@ramapo.edu
    Amount: $3650, Date: December 2014.
    Description: This project extends the Problets programming tutor to handle both instructor-designed and autonomously evolved Parsons Puzzles. Parsons Puzzles present students with shuffled fragments of a valid program’s source, its requirements, and bugged fragments – “distractors”. They require students to select appropriate fragments to reconstitute the original program. The extended Problets programming tutor will be used to conduct a comparative study of both instructor-designed problems and automatically generated problems.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2014-gaspar.pdf
  51. Title: Adapting Computer Science Education to the Internet Age (2014)
    Authors: Yifat Kolikant, Affiliation: , Email: yifat.kolikant@mail.huji.ac.il
    Sally Fincher, Affiliation: , Email: S.A.Fincher@kent.ac.uk
    Josh Tenenberg, Affiliation: , Email: jtenenbg@uw.edu
    Amount: $3650, Date: December 2014.
    Description: Based on the premise that people live surrounded by information, resources, experiences, and knowledge shared through the Internet, this research project explores how the reality of person-plus-crowd is reflected in the practices, values, and capabilities of professional programmers, students, and teachers. The results of this project will be used to address the important pedagogical questions of how CS education should change given this reality, as well as what and how students should be taught to better prepare them for this aspect of their professional lives outside school.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2014-kolikant.pdf
  52. Title: Creating a Polished CS Education Zoo to Share CS Educators’ Ideas (2014)
    Authors: Steven Wolfman, Affiliation: , Email: wolf@cs.ubc.ca
    William Byrd, Affiliation: , Email: webyrd@gmail.com
    Amount: $2700, Date: December 2014.
    Description: The CS Education Zoo is an ongoing series of hour-long video blogs led by Will Byrd and Steven Wolfman in which the hosts discuss CS Education with guests from various positions and backgrounds. Guests include university CS educators in various positions, Computer Scientists in industry positions with particular insight on CS education, CS education researchers, and non-traditional CS educators. The show’s goals include spreading best CS education practices, inspiring educators to try innovative practices, sharing viewpoints with educators that they would rarely receive, and exposing the often private practice of teaching. The project will yield an improved, sustainable web and social media presence; sixteen polished episodes that are easy to view, search, and share; and an ongoing positive impact on dissemination of ideas in CS education.
    Files:
    • Final project report – SP-report-2014-wolfman.pdf
  53. Title: Opening CS Circles: A Platform for Interactive Lessons and Exercises (2013)
    Authors: David Pritchard, Affiliation: , Email: dp6@princeton.edu
    Sandy Graham, Affiliation: , Email: sandy.graham@uwaterloo.ca
    Troy Vasiga, Affiliation: , Email: tmjvasiga@uwaterloo.ca
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2013.
    Description: “Computer Science Circles” (http://cscircles.cemc.uwaterloo.ca/) teaches introductory Python. We will release it as an open source WordPress plugin, and share all current lessons and exercises under a Creative Commons license. We will also allow users to author, share and remix content, so teachers can build custom courses to suit their needs.
    Files:
    • Publication from project – https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2676723.2691910
    • Project poster – http://ints.io/daveagp/research/2015/cscircles-poster.pdf
  54. Title: Curriculum-In-A-Box (2013) (2013)
    Authors: Jandelyn Plane, Affiliation: , Email: jplane@cs.umd.edu
    Elissa Redmiles, Affiliation: , Email: eredmiles@cs.umd.edu
    Amount: $5,000 US, Date: December 2013.
    Description: The Maryland Center for Women in Computing is committed to improving gender diversity for current and future generations of computer scientists through retention, research, and outreach programs. Curriculum-In-A-Box is a series of hands-on curriculum modules, video lectures and mentorship resources that will be created and made available for free download to assist K-12 educators, parents and other universities.
    Files:

  55. Title: Supporting a Research Community Around Web-Scale Data Gathering (2012)
    Authors: Ian Utting, Affiliation: , Email: I.A.Utting@kent.ac.uk
    Michael Kölling, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2012.
    Description: Support for the creation of a large-scale repository of data about the behaviour of beginning programmers using the BlueJ Java IDE, and providing access to the data for CS Education Researchers world-wide. Construction and support of a community around the data.
    Files:

  56. Title: CloudCoder: Using Crowdsourced Programming Exercises to Improve Student Learning in CS1 (2012)
    Authors: David Hovemeyer, Affiliation: , Email: dhovemey@ycp.edu
    Jaime Spacco, Affiliation: , Email: jspacco@knox.edu
    Amount: $4,000, Date: May 2012.
    Description: Short programming exercises are useful for assessment and skills reinforcement in introductory CS courses. However, developing good exercises is difficult. By adding exercise sharing features to the open source CloudCoder system, we will make it easier for instructors to share, assess, and improve exercises, benefiting the overall CS education community.
    Files:

  57. Title: A Computer Security Card Game: A Vehicle for Computer Security Outreach and Education (2012)
    Authors: Tamara Denning, Affiliation: , Email: tdenning@cs.washington.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2012.
    Description: We are developing an educational computer security card game, designed for cooperative learning amongst 3 to 6 players. The game is designed to raise awareness and improve understanding of key issues in computer security. Players play hackers (in the traditional, ethical sense) and learn about computer security while completing Missions.
    Files:

  58. Title: Computing Attitudes Survey (CAS) Validation Project (2012)
    Authors: Allison Elliot Tew, Affiliation: , Email: aetew@u.washington.edu
    Brian Dorn, Affiliation: , Email: bdorn@hartford.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2012.
    Description: The goal of the CAS Validation Project is to develop a valid instrument for measuring the development of expert-like attitudes about CS for university students. Building upon success in validating the instrument locally, we will conduct a large-scale empirical study and interviews so the instrument can be made widely available.
    Files:

  59. Title: Enhancing an Interactive Textbook with Community Moderated Exercises (2012)
    Authors: Brad Miller, Affiliation: , Email: millbr02@luther.edu
    David Ranum, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: $4,000, Date: November 2012.
    Description: Runestone Interactive is a project focusing on providing tools and content for the purpose of creating interactive computer science courseware. This new project will add an enhancement that allows community moderated programming exercises. Students will be able to submit, vote, rank, and critique solutions to problems that are part of the interactive text.
    Files:

  60. Title: Keystrokes: A System for Capturing Textual Development in Video-Based Learning (2012)
    Authors: Chris Johnson, Affiliation: , Email: johnch@uwec.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2012.
    Description: With the rise of video-based learning, instructors who use live-coding to teach face a challenge: source code in videos is hard to read and locked up in pixels. We propose Keystrokes, a software suite for capturing and playing back “text movies,” whose contents students may freely interact with and repurpose.
    Files:

  61. Title: Pythy–a Cloud-Based IDE for Novice Python Programmers (2012)
    Authors: Anthony Allevato, Affiliation: , Email: allevato@vt.edu
    Stephen Edwards, Affiliation: , Email: edwards@cs.vt.edu
    Amount: $3,360, Date: May 2012.
    Description: Pythy is a web-based programming environment for Python that eliminates software-related barriers to entry for novice programmers, such as installing an IDE or the Python runtime. Using only a web browser, within seconds students can begin writing code, watch it run, and access support materials and tutorials.
    Files:

  62. Title: Managing Student Deliverables in a Collaborative Online Game Design Course (2011)
    Authors: Ursula Wolz, Affiliation: , Email: wolzu@montclair.edu
    Amount: $2,500, Date: August 2011.
    Description: Game design is a means to motivate students to pursue coursework in computer science. Since teacher expertise is sparse, a solution is to create online courses. This project pilots effective transfer of a highly collaborative pedagogy with a paper-based student deliverables procedure to a fully online experience.
    Files:

  63. Title: Teaching HS Computer Science as if the Rest of the World Existed (2011)
    Authors: Scott Portnoff, Affiliation: , Email: srp4379@lausd.net
    Amount: $2,500, Date: August 2011.
    Description: Design, Implementation and Rationale for a HS CS Curriculum of Interdisciplinary Central-Problem-Based (ICPB) Units that Model Real-World Applications. Units address the complexities of solving central problems in the fields of Astronomy, Molecular Modeling, Political Science (Voting), Environmental Science, Bioinformatics/Evolution, Music, and Ethics/Holocaust Studies.
    Files:

  64. Title: Robotics Training for Rural and Urban Middle School Teachers (2011)
    Authors: Jeff Gray, Affiliation: , Email: gray@cs.ua.edu
    Amount: $2,500, Date: August 2011.
    Description: We have 30 existing robots that we plan to loan to rural and inner-city schools throughout the state of Alabama. This Special Project would provide the travel to support the weekend training of 15 teachers. Additionally, the project would supply the plaques and awards for our state-wide K-12 robotics contest.
    Files:

  65. Title: Learning About Network Security Threats in a Safe, Easy Sandbox (2011)
    Authors: Michael Jipping, Affiliation: , Email: jipping@hope.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: November 2011.
    Description: This proposal describes a project to create exercises that allow demonstration of network security threats. The exercises will be easy to set up and demonstrate and will be usable to experimentation. Virtual machines will be preconstructed for scripted setup and execution.
    Files:

  66. Title: The Enculturation of Taurus (Taulbee for the Rest of Us) (2010)
    Authors: Jodi Tims, Affiliation: , Email: jltims@bw.edu
    Susan Williams, Affiliation: , Email: rebstock@georgiasouthern.edu
    Amount: $2,400, Date: August 2010.
    Description: The “Taulbee for the Rest of Us” special project was an important first step in providing student and faculty information for institutions that offer computing degrees but are not Ph.D. granting. This project will modify and expand the survey in a manner that will make it sustainable on a yearly basis.
    Files:

  67. Title: Informal Learning of Computing by Computing Students (2009)
    Authors: Robert McCartney, Affiliation: , Email: robert@engr.uconn.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2009.
    Description:
    Files:

  68. Title: Enhancing engagement through a modern ‘device to think with’ (2009)
    Authors: David J. Barnes, Affiliation: , Email: d.j.barnes@kent.ac.uk
    Dermot Shinners-Kennedy, Affiliation: , Email: dermot.shinners-kennedy@ul.ie
    Amount: , Date: August 2009.
    Description:
    Files:

  69. Title: Scratch clubs: Involving students in school Computer Science (2008)
    Authors: Charles Boisvert, Affiliation: , Email: CBOISVER@ccn.ac.uk
    Amount: , Date: November 2008.
    Description:
    Files:

  70. Title: An intelligent tutoring system to assist the learning of relational database schema normalization (2008)
    Authors: Feng-Jen Yang, Affiliation: , Email: feng-jen.yang@unt.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2008.
    Description:
    Files:

  71. Title: Contextualized Approaches to Computing Education (2008)
    Authors: Margaret Hamilton, Affiliation: , Email: Margaret.Hamilton@rmit.edu.au
    Amount: , Date: August 2008.
    Description:
    Files:

  72. Title: Curriculum Resource Repository for Teaching Computer Security (2008)
    Authors: Carol Taylor, Affiliation: , Email: ctaylor4214@comcast.net
    Tammy Alexander, Affiliation: , Email: tammy.alexander@memphis.edu
    Amount: , Date: August 2008.
    Description:
    Files:

  73. Title: Plagarism Detection and Research Writing Validation (2007)
    Authors: Thomas Way, Affiliation: , Email: thomas.way@villanova.edu
    Amount: , Date: May 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  74. Title: A workshop on classifying publications in computing education research (2007)
    Authors: Simon, Affiliation: , Email: simon@newcastle.edu.au
    Amount: , Date: November 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  75. Title: The “Plugged-in” Audience Grows: Podcasts in Instruction in the State of (2007)
    Authors: Jane Ritter, Affiliation: , Email: jane@cs.uoregon.edu
    Amount: , Date: August 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  76. Title: Problem Solving using Video Scenarios (2007)
    Authors: Madalene Spezialetti, Affiliation: , Email: Madalene.spezialetti@trincoll.edu
    Amount: , Date: August 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  77. Title: Towards Developing a Resource Guide for Student Projects (2007)
    Authors: Narayanan T Ramachandran, Affiliation: , Email: narayanan@mecit.edu.om
    Amount: , Date: August 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  78. Title: Building a multi-perspective digital library to facilitate teaching computing research methods across the curriculum (2007)
    Authors: Hilary Holz, Affiliation: , Email: hilary.holz@csueastbay.edu
    Anne Applin, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2007.
    Description:
    Files:
    • Final Report – SP-report-2007-holz.pdf
  79. Title: Learning Support for a Security Class Suited for Non-majors (2007)
    Authors: Alan Fekete, Affiliation: , Email: fekete@it.usyd.edu.au
    Judy Kay, Affiliation: , Email: judy@it.usyd.edu.au
    Robert Kummerfield, Affiliation: , Email: bob@it.usyd.edu.au
    Amount: , Date: May 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  80. Title: Engaging and Interactive Security Education through Second Life (2007)
    Authors: Jungwoo Ryoo, Affiliation: , Email:
    Dongwon Lee, Affiliation: , Email:
    Angsana Techatassannasoontorn, Affiliation: , Email: jxr65@psu.edu
    Amount: , Date: May 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  81. Title: BRACELet: Investigating the link between the reading and writing of code (2007)
    Authors: Jacqueline Whalley, Affiliation: , Email: jwhalley@aut.ac.nz
    Tony Clear, Affiliation: , Email: tclear@aut.ac.nz
    Amount: , Date: May 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  82. Title: The Taulbee Report For the Rest of US (2007)
    Authors: Michael Goldweber, Affiliation: , Email: mikeyg@cs.xu.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2007.
    Description:
    Files:

  83. Title: Software Engineering Early (2006)
    Authors: Cherry Owen, Affiliation: , Email: owen_c@utpb.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  84. Title: Science Applications for an Introductory Programming Course (2006)
    Authors: Chaya Gurwitz, Affiliation: , Email: gurwitz@sci.brooklyn.cuny.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  85. Title: Exploring the value of consultative processes in data analysis in an educational setting (2006)
    Authors: Judy Sheard, Affiliation: , Email: judy.sheard@infotech.monash.edu.au
    Amount: , Date: November 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  86. Title: Facilitating Curriculum Material Adoption using 3D Virtual Collaboration (2006)
    Authors: Chang Liu, Affiliation: , Email: liuc@ohio.edu
    Jennifer Polack, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: , Date: May 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  87. Title: How to Inspire Interests in Mathematics: an Undergraduate Lecture Series (2006)
    Authors: Edith Law, Affiliation: , Email: edith.law@mail.mcgill.ca
    Amount: , Date: May 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  88. Title: Educating Homo Ludens: Introducing Technology Through Game Design (2006)
    Authors: Bruce Maxim, Affiliation: , Email: bmaxim@engin.umd.umich.edu
    William Grosky, Affiliation: , Email:
    Amount: , Date: April 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  89. Title: Learning Assembly Language with Java Bytecode on Lego Robots (2006)
    Authors: Mike Jipping, Affiliation: , Email: jipping@cs.hope.edu
    Amount: , Date: February 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  90. Title: Integrating Security into the Software Development Process (2006)
    Authors: Rose Shumba, Affiliation: , Email: shumba@iup.edu
    Amount: , Date: April 2006.
    Description:
    Files:

  91. Title: Programming External RAM via a PC Parallel Port (2005)
    Authors: David Heise, Affiliation: Columbia College, Email: dheise@ccis.edu
    Amount: $2,000, Date: March 2005.
    Description: This project will create the hardware and software tools for Computer Architecture students to load programs onto the processor they construct for the course from a PC parallel port, obviating the tedious process of programming machine code using switches.
    Files:

  92. Title: A Methodological Review of Computer Science Research 2000 - 2005 (2005)
    Authors: Justus Randolph, Affiliation: , Email: justus.randolph@cs.joensuu.fi
    Amount: , Date: December 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  93. Title: Knowledge Construction of Abstract Concepts in Introductory Computer Science (2005)
    Authors: Tim Yuen, Affiliation: , Email: tyuen@mail.utexas.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  94. Title: First International Workshop on Phenomography in Computing Education Research (2005)
    Authors: Raymond Lister, Affiliation: Anders Berglund, Email: raymond@it.uts.edu.au
    Amount: , Date: November 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  95. Title: Creating a SIGCSE Presence in the Former Soviet Union (2005)
    Authors: John Impagliazzo, Affiliation: , Email: John.Impagliazzo@hofstra.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  96. Title: Seeing the Coding Process: Increasing Novice program Development Skills through Video Enhanced Case Studies (2005)
    Authors: Simon Gray, Affiliation: , Email: SGRAY@wooster.edu
    Amount: , Date: November 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  97. Title: Creating a Disciplinary Commons in Computer Science Through the use of Course Portfolios (2005)
    Authors: Josh Tenenberg, Affiliation: University of Washington, Tacoma, Email: jtenenbg@u.washington.edu
    Amount: $4,990, Date: August 2005.
    Description: The Portfolio Commons involves the collaborative production and peer review of course portfolios by faculty teaching at both 2-year and 4-year colleges and universities in western Washington state. The goals are to document and share knowledge about student learning in CS and to improve the quality of CS teaching by incorporating scholarly practices for making teaching public, peer-reviewed, and amenable for future use and development by other CS educators.
    Files:

  98. Title: Designing and Evaluating Programs in Computer Science Education (2005)
    Authors: Justus Randolph, Affiliation: , Email: justus.randolph@cs.joensuu.fi
    Amount: , Date: August 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  99. Title: A Course on Ethical Issues in Computing Linking Students at Villanova University and Universidade Nova de Lisboa (2005)
    Authors: William Fleishmann, Affiliation: , Email: william.fleischman@villanova.edu
    Amount: , Date: August 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  100. Title: Training to Persist in Computing Careers (2005)
    Authors: Kristi Honaker, Affiliation: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Email: pace_nsf@vt.edu
    Amount: $4,900, Date: July 2005.
    Description: We will develop a Career Resilience toolkit and training module designed to help students cope with computing career stressors. The project’s ultimate goal is to retain minority computing students by encouraging the development of soft skills and coping strategies. The toolkit will include step-by-step modules SIGCSE members can facilitate.
    Files:

  101. Title: Software Architecture Improvement through Test-driven Development: An Empirical Study (2005)
    Authors: David Janzen, Affiliation: Bethel College, Email: DJANZEN@bethelks.edu
    Amount: $4,635, Date: May 2005.
    Description: Test-driven development promises to improves software through both design and testing. This project will perform a series of empirical studies that will examine the efficacy of test-driven development, explore its place in the undergraduate curriculum, and evaluate an educational approach called test-driven learning.
    Files:

  102. Title: Accessible Software Engineering for the Visually Impaired (ASEVI) (2005)
    Authors: Stephanie Ludi, Affiliation: , Email: salvse@rit.edu
    Amount: , Date: December 2005.
    Description:
    Files:

  103. Title: A visualization system to support software development comprehension: evaluation (2004)
    Authors: Charles Boisvert, Affiliation: City College Norwich, UK, Email: cboisver@ccn.ac.uk
    Amount: $4896, Date: August 2004.
    Description: eL-CID supports students’ understanding of program development by visualising development history. This project aims to evaluate eL-CID with introductory programming students in a classroom setting. I will build a set of teaching examples and carry out a questionnaire evaluation, analyze forum transcripts and if conditions allow run a crossover study.
    Files:

  104. Title: Towards the development of “best practices” for teaching information assurance courses (2004)
    Authors: Rose Shumba, Affiliation: Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Email: shumba@iup.edu
    Amount: $2,853, Date: July 2004.
    Description: The aim of this project is to provide some groundwork towards the development of “best practices” for the teaching of information assurance courses. This will be achieved by the evaluation of the effectiveness of available CERT recommended security tools, developing hands-on laboratory exercises for the tools and then integrating the developed hands- on lab exercises and the theories and principles of information assurance courses. A student will be hired to assist with the project.
    Files:

  105. Title: Projects in Wireless and Ad-Hoc Network Simulation (2004)
    Authors: Chris McDonald, Affiliation: University of Western Australia, Email:
    Amount: $2,700, Date: May 2004.
    Description: This project will extend the existing cnet networking simulator to support the exciting new areas of mobile and ad-hoc networks through the addition of wireless Ethernet and Bluetooth communication links. New laboratory and project exercises, examining table-driven and on-demand protocols, will also be developed.
    Files:

  106. Title: A Remote Program Viewer (2004)
    Authors: Charles Dierbach, Affiliation: Towson University, Email: cdierbach@towson.edu
    Amount: $2,768, Date: May 2004.
    Description: This project involves the development of a remote program viewer allowing two users anywhere across the Internet to view a common set of program files and interactively discuss. Such a tool would be useful for both student-instructor interaction, and collaborative learning by students. http://triton.towson.edu/~dierbach/RemoteViewer/Main.htm
    Files:

  107. Title: Creating Computer Exercises Involving Computer Security (2004)
    Authors: Charles Ashbacher, Affiliation: Mount Mercy College, Email:
    Amount: $1,000, Date: February 2004.
    Description: This project will develop software to demonstrate particular concepts in computer security: code obfuscation and steganography (in this case, the hiding of messages in image files). The final source code and documentation will be released as open source and posted on the SIGCSE web site.
    Files:

  108. Title: A Course on Ethical Issues in Computing Linking Students at Villanova University and Universidade Nova de Lisboa (2004)
    Authors: William Fleischman, Affiliation: Villanova University and Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Email: william.fleischman@villanova.edu
    Amount: $3,400, Date: December 2004.
    Description: This project will support development of course materials and implementation of interactive videoconference sessions linking undergraduate students at Villanova University and Universidade Nova de Lisboa in discussions of ethical issues in computing. The project is seen as a means of broadening the perspectives of students at both institutions
    Files:

  109. Title: Designing and Evaluating Programs in Computer Science Education (2004)
    Authors: Justus Randolph, Affiliation: University of Joensuu, Finland, Email: justusrandolph@yahoo.com
    Amount: $4,750, Date: August 2004.
    Description: A research project to develop best practices in designing and evaluating programs in CS education is proposed. Research activities will include a systematic review of CSE programs and confirm tory case studies of the design and evaluation process of three CSE programs
    Files:

  110. Title: Electronic Archiving of Workshop on Computer Architecture Education Proceedings (2003)
    Authors: Edward F. Gehringer, Affiliation: North Carolina State University, Email: efg@ncsu.edu
    Amount: $1,600, Date: May 2003.
    Description: Since 1995, approximately ten Workshops in Computer Architecture Education have been held in conjunction with ACM/SIGArch conferences. The proposer has organized the last three workshops (2000, 2002, and 2003). The pre-2000 proceedings are not online or in any other archival form. The proposed activity is to pay a student to contact the authors, obtain the files, and put those proceedings on line with appropriate metadata. Refer to the project home page for current status and additional information: http://www4.ncsu.edu/~efg/wcaes.html
    Files:

  111. Title: Bioinformatics in the Computer Science Curriculum (2003)
    Authors: Matt DeJongh, Affiliation: , Email: dejongh@hope.edu
    Mark D. LeBlanc, Affiliation: Hope College; Wheaton College, Email: mleblanc@wheatoncollege.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: July 2003.
    Description: We propose to identify computationally rich examples from bioinformatics that map to core units in Computing Curricula 2001 and investigate ways of incorporating them into the computer science curriculum. We will develop sample course materials that will benefit members of SIGCSE who are interested in incorporating bioinformatics in their courses. http://www.cs.hope.edu/~dejongh/bioinformatics/sigcse/
    Files:

  112. Title: Building Research in Australasian Computer Education (BRACE) (2003)
    Authors: Raymond Lister, Affiliation: University of Technology, Sydney, Email: raymond@it.uts.edu.au
    Amount: $5,000, Date: October 2003.
    Description: We propose to run a workshop on research into computer science education (4 days, up to 20 participants). The workshop leads onto a shared research project and publication(s). It will be set in Australasia, and modeled on two successful NSF-funded workshops previously held in America. http://www.cs.otago.ac.nz/brace
    Files:

  113. Title: Task Force to Develop Java-Based Resources for Introductory CS (2003)
    Authors: Eric Roberts, Affiliation: Stanford University, Email: eroberts@cs.stanford.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: October 2003.
    Description: This project supports the work of a new ACM Education Board task force to develop a collection of Java-based resources to support the teaching of introductory computer science at both the secondary school and college level
    Files:

  114. Title: A Framework for Playing Network Games in CS1/CS2 (2003)
    Authors: Richard E. Pattis, Affiliation: Carnegie Mellon University, Email: pattis@acm.org
    Amount: $3,200, Date: May 2003.
    Description: I will develop a Java framework (and JavaDoc API) allowing CS1/CS2 students to write games played over a network. Games are hosted on one machine (storing shared state). Manual or automated players on other machines command/query it via strings. I’ll write several assignments and sample games to distribute with this framework. Refer to the project home page for current status and additional information: http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~pattis/grants/sigcsegrant2003.html
    Files:

  115. Title: Student Program Documentation Analysis and Feedback (2003)
    Authors: Jesse M. Heines, Affiliation: University of Massachusetts Lowell, Email: heines@cs.uml.edu
    Amount: $5,000, Date: May 2003.
    Description: This project will produce a publicly available, Web-based application that analyzes program documentation and provides constructive feedback on how to improve that documentation. The final product will be similar in look and feel to the validators on the W3C Web site, but with added guidance on how to correct shortcomings. http://teaching.cs.uml.edu/~heines/projects/docvalidator
    Files:

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